30 SUPER SIMPLE eco-friendly ways to combat climate change (for the average Joe!)

Super storms Harvey and Irma have shook the nation. And with that, no one active on social media has been able to avoid articles about how climate change (in other words we) may have caused these storms.

Though we haven’t exactly caused them, the warmer water in the ocean – a result of man-made climate change – has made these storms stronger and bigger.

Some people pretend money is what is holding them back from living a greener life, however eco-bloggers have again and again proven that that is not a valid excuse. Others claim they  “don’t have the time to make an effort”. (I think what is really holding people back is they don’t want to make an effort, also known as laziness.)

A wise man once said it’s not about having time, it’s about taking time. And these resent storms may have changed people’s attitude a little, making this the time to start thinking about taking the time to kick start some new habits which prevent further climate change. We can’t take back the warming that’s already been done, but we can slow down. Hopefully setting our children up for a better starting point when they are ready to come up with awesome ways to carbon capture and make salt water into fresh water without using too much energy.

Now, without further ado,

Here are my 30 SUPER SIMPLE budget-friendly and time-friendly green habits!

1. Buy organic food when it’s sitting right in front of you at the grocery store.

2. Use reusable produce bags and check out bags (keep them in your car!).

3. Never bag produce that don’t need to be bagged – see this post for more tips.

4. REFUSE straws when you’re eating and drinking out – every time.

5. Buy recycled batteriestoilet paper, kitchen towels and trash bags.

6. Use bio-based, all natural washing liquid and dishwasher soap/detergent.

7. Switch your plastic bottled shower gel for bar soap.

8. Use cloth kitchen towels to clean messes as much as possible.

9. Switch ground beef for turkey or better yet pea protein for ALL ground beef recipes.

10. Switch beef burgers for delicious black bean burgers.

11. Order a proper amount of food at restaurants so you don’t need to-go boxes, yet don’t waste food.

12. Never get cheesecake to go.

13. Turn off the water when you brush your teeth, do dishes or wash your face.

14. Don’t buy clothes you don’t need (especially made in China). You do NOT need a new dress for every occasion. No one will remember what you wore.

15. Don’t buy home decorations you don’t need (especially made in China) including Christmas and Halloween junk.

16. Shop toys and baby items second hand. Babies and young kids don’t know where their things come from.

17. Buy eggs from locally pasture-raised hens (packed in cardboard not Styrofoam).

18. Vote for politicians who care about the environment and support a future based on only renewable energy.

19. Support an environmental charity via a monthly auto-draft. Most organizations let you start as low as $5 per month if funds are tight. Set it up once, then forget :)

20. Stop buying soda, reduce the amount you buy or get a soda stream to make your own.

21. Follow my blog and instagram @sustainableanna for more tips :)

22. Stop buying bottled water at the store for your family to just “drink at home”.

23. Order chicken or veggies instead of steak at restaurants.

24. Bring a reusable water bottle and/or coffee mug from home with you every day!

25. Wash and reuse aluminum foil. No reason not to!

26. Switch your dairy yoghurt for coconut yoghurt.

27. Recycle!

28. Skip one phone upgrade, for example go from the I-phone 5 straight to the 7.

29. Avoid buying, wearing and washing polyester clothing  (or get a fiber-catcher.)

30. Switch your make-up remover and body lotion (plastic bottles) to coconut oil (glass).

There are more things you can do, like go vegan, go zero waste, buy an electric car, stop travelling, bike more, get solar panels, yada, yada, yada. But today I am not asking you to change anything major in your life for the eco-cause. My goal is not to scare you off. That’s why I love that this list is about simplicity.

Doing (some of) these super simple, minimal effort things, actually mean you care about plastic free oceans, clean air, climate change and preventing future EVEN BIGGER storms.

It doesn’t have to be expensive, time-consuming or hard! And you’ll feel great getting started :)

Harvey who?

Five brands that’ll make you Captain Sustainable Underpants!

A question I get asked a lot is “Do you know any made in USA underwear brands?” to which I always reply: Yes, as a matter of fact I do!

Made in USA isn’t really enough, they need to be sustainable too, right? Here’s my list of fabulous makers to get you started. (Two undies-makers are not based here but made the list anyway!)

Sustainable underwear brands

1. Hanky Panky

Made in: North East USA since 1977

They’ve got: Women’s lingerie, sleepwear, bras, bralettes, panties.

Sustainable because: It’s made right here which is great for our economy and our people. 100% of the fabrics and trims used to make their lace styles are knitted in the USA as well. The styles I have bought are all organic cotton (grown here!) which is safe for farmers, lands and butts alike.

Awesome because: It’s sexy and sustainable. Organic cotton undies are often pretty boring, but not here. Also this is the only American-made brand that offers padded, shaped bras – not just soft bralettes.

Fun Fact: Instead of water coolers with plastic bottles, Hanky Panky has installed filters to purify their NYC tap water, and each employee is provided with a BPA-free reusable water cup to reduce waste around the office.

Hanky Panky organic cotton

2. BGreen

Made in: Rancho Dominguez, California.

They’ve got: Women’s and men’s underwear, shirts, base layers.

Sustainable because: Made of organic cotton, recycled cotton or recycled polyester. 100% of the fabric scraps generated during the cutting process is recycled adding up to about 200,000 lbs. of material per year that doesn’t end up in the landfill! The factory is Fair Trade Certified which signifies that rigorous social, environmental, and economic standards have been met.

Awesome because: You can’t take for granted that garment workers in Los Angeles actually make a good living even if we are, by definition, talking “Made in USA”. (Immigrant workers are often taken advantage of, not making a living wage, which unfortunately is why lots of “cheaper” made in USA clothes are made in California.) With a Fair Trade Certification we know we can trust BGreen!

Fun Fact: In addition to their own production, this family-owned factory has been producing apparel for some of the best-known brands in United States for over 30 years.

3. Brook There

Made in: Fall River, Massachusetts.

They’ve got: Women’s underwear, bralettes, tops, dresses, skirts, leggings.

Sustainable because: The base fabric is an organic cotton jersey made from GOTS-certified yarn, milled in South Carolina and dyed in Pennsylvania. All undies are shipped straight from the cut and sew facility, and not a separate warehouse, meaning they don’t have to use any plastic bags for storage. Plastic free and organic! Yay!

Awesome because: The underwear is comfortable, comes in many styles and super pretty. Oh, and I love their modern, organic, cool take on the granny panty! (They call it the “boyshort” though ;))

Fun Fact: Brook There’s design studio happens to be situated on an organic vegetable farm.

Brook There made in USA organic underwear

4. PACT

Made in: India, Turkey.

They’ve got: Women’s and men’s underwear, shirts, pants, sleepwear, socks.

Sustainable because: PACT’s underwear factory is Certified Fair Trade which complies with legislation regarding maximum working hours, overtime compensation and other benefits  such as transport to and from the jobsite, company sponsored meals, health plans, and funding for workers’ children’s education. The cotton used in PACT undies is GOTS-certified organic cotton. You can read more about cotton farmers and the importance of supporting organic fields in India here.

Awesome because: Comfy and soft. Also, they’ve got several fun prints with flowers and stripes – not just solid colored cotton. And this brand is not just for grownups, they’ve got a few baby onesies too.

Fun Fact: I’ve blogged about PACT before! You can read that post here.

5. Thinx

Made in: Sri Lanka

They’ve got: Women’s period underwear, active wear.

Sustainable because: Thinx underwear is period underwear. Meaning that by having a few of these in your drawer you can save lots of disposable pads and liners from hitting the landfill! If you’re curious about waste free periods, check out Kathryn’s post at Going Zero Waste here. All Thinx’s manufacturing is certified Fair Trade and they just added an organic cotton line of undies! 

Awesome because: This company is run by women, sewn by women and made for women. The Thinx undies do work (holds the same amount as about two tampons), fit nicely and look like regular undies.

Fun Fact: They also have a fair trade (not aid!) initiative going on where girls are trained in entrepreneurship and sewing, among other things, reusable pads. It may be hard to grasp but periods are a major issue in some developing countries, preventing girls from attending school several days per month, which means they’re lagging behind their male peers. You can read more about Thinx’s foundation here.

Brook There organic hipster panty

That’s it! Five brands. Five styles.

I have to say my super favorite is Hanky Panky’s boyshort undies in organic cotton with lace trim ($32). I “need” twenty of those ASAP :)

***

This list wasn’t what you were looking for? Here are some bonus tips:

Looking for socks? I’d go to REI (so many made in USA brands!) or order me some Colorado-made Smartwool’s. In need of a maternity bra? You’ll find a comfy one at Storq.com. All in all disappointed with my coverage of men’s underwear? Here’s a list of made in USA brands to check out (my husband hasn’t tried them so can’t recommend any specifically!). In Europe? Woron Store might be for you.

Hurricane Harvey, a whole lotta rain, and how you can chip in

Hi all!

Please excuse the silence here on the blog while we are dealing with and following along with Tropical Storm Harvey and the devastating flooding situation in Houston. My family is doing great. We are dry, safe, and without a drop of water inside.

I have friends who’s houses have flooded, are completely stranded in their homes or have been separated from family. So yes, we’re doing great.

IMG_3244

Caitlin, who lives in Lafayette, LA, and writes the great blog EcoCajun, put together a great list of how you can help the people of Houston and surrounding areas, affected by Hurricane Harvey.

“Being so close to Texas, and with Louisiana potentially in Harvey’s crosshairs this week, the devastation is all I can think about. After the historic flooding in Lafayette and Baton Rouge last August, it’s even more heartbreaking to watch Texas go through the same thing. The emotions are still so raw for so many in South Louisiana who have recovered and are still recovering from last year.”

Here’s HOW TO HELP THOSE AFFECTED BY HARVEY.

Thank you Caitlin for putting together a list when I am too distracted to get to blog work!

Stay safe out there! And here’s to hoping you all stay dry too.

xo Anna

Is your new dress funding North Korea’s nuclear program? Find out.

You know, some people think it’s really silly to refuse straws and shop local. They “kind of care” about the environment, and yes, they’ll agree climate change is real, but it’s just not enough for them to change any of their habits.

Keeping our environment safe isn’t enough. Reducing global warming (yes, that ol’ term!) isn’t enough.

So, a Not Made in China challenge is CRAZY right? Why would anyone give up shopping away on Amazon for something like that!??

I recently shared my six reasons for not buying made in China here on the blog, and although one of them has nothing to do with the environment, all six are rooted in sustainability. Sustainable world, sustainable economy.

“Anna, we don’t care about sustainability! We care about cheap stuff!”

I know.

However, here’s something “awesome” that has just been revealed, that some of you might actually care about:

Your made in China clothes could be made in North Korea.

Yes, you read that right.

It’s becoming more and more common for Chinese textile businesses to take advantage of the cheap labor across the border, yet still labeling items “Made in China” according to a recent report from Reuters.

“Textiles were North Korea’s second-biggest export after coal and other minerals in 2016, totaling $752 million, according to data from the Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency (KOTRA).”

The fascinating thing about that is that all of North Korea’s factories are state-owned. Remind me now, how do we all like the state of North Korea?

“In North Korea, factory workers can’t just go to the toilet whenever they feel like, they think it slows down the whole assembly line. They aren’t like Chinese factory workers who just work for the money. North Koreans have a different attitude – they believe they are working for their country, for their leader.”

Would you, as an American, sleep well at night knowing that YOU helped fund North Korea’s nuclear program?

Our purchases matter. EVERY DAMN TIME. For so many reasons.

I may be a tree-hugging, tag checking, straw refusing liberal, but at least I know who and what I am funding with my dollars.

Do you?

[Quotes from the Reuters article, which you can read HERE.]

I want my baby to wear ethical fashion; starting with his bibs!

Do you know what makes shopping local so wonderful and extra awesome?

It’s that behind almost every brand committed to fair and local manufacturing stands a woman or man with a vision to make the world better. No bullshit. This is what I find over and over with made right (here) brands.

Some are motivated by sustainability, some by employing their neighbors , some want to bring craftsmanship back. Some, like the founders of Sweedie Kids, found that with their scarf-like bibs, they could make a big impact on the life of bigger kids with disabilities.

Sweedie Kids bib big kid disabilities

“We care about giving, and we do that through “Sweedie Dreams”. When you purchase a Big Kid Bib, you are contributing to Sweedie Dreams because it’s not just a product, it represents our passion for serving those with special needs. For each Big Kid Bib we sell, we give $1 to an organization tied to serving those with different abilities.”

Nowadays it’s not that hard to find cute, made in USA bibs for babies, but what makes Sweedie Kids the most ethical choice is that they’re also making bibs for a market that is so often forgotten. For children who are so often forgotten.

Super absorbent, cool designs and made from Oeko-Tex certified fabrics (i.e. certified safe, sustainable, ethical materials), these bibs get the job done no matter the age of the wearer.

Made in USA baby bib cactus

August has been modeling these bibs since he was about three months old. I wouldn’t go as far as saying they make drooling cool, but maybe just a tad bit more fashionable. (They’re also pretty great for when we practice drinking out of a glass. Let’s just say that not all the water ends up in baby’s tummy just yet!)

Check out Sweedie Kids here. Bibs start at $8.

Handmade in USA of imported fabrics.

Conscious consumers, sure, but where the F is the industry?

I once got into a fight with the CEO of the company where I work over the question if the industry or the consumers are responsible for the current environmental destruction in this world. He said consumers like me (and I quote) are and I told him he was dead wrong; industry leaders like him are. (No, didn’t get fired, though some colleagues feared for my survival, and I’m pretty sure I’m on the black list.)

If I had to put a number on it I’d say the industry carries 75% of the responsibility and we only 25. At best, I’d accept a 50/50. Here’s why.

THE PROBLEM

Heading home from work, super late and hungry, I might stop at a coffee shop or gas station for human fuel. Pretty fast, I will discover that there is 1. No tasty vegan food (and no, kale chips don’t count) and 2. Everything is wrapped in or packed in plastic. Not minimalistic style plastic either – huge boxes, double wrap. Should conscious consumers skip the snack because the industry only provides us with bad eco-choices?

There are countless situations like this, where consumers “have no choice” but to swallow the plastic wrap. Like, for example, when

  1. The grocery store automatically prints a BPA-coated receipt and hands it to you like you want it.
  2. The airline serves you and millions of other travelers factory farmed beef on a one-time-use plastic plate. (I’m pretty sure  that what isn’t consumed on the flight is thrown out, so there’s no point in “zero wasting” this one, unless you emailed before and told them not to make a meal for you.)
  3. The municipality where you live decide not to invest in safe bike lanes, side walks and public transport so you can safely skip the car.
  4. The oil companies work full time to make legislation that prevents solar power and electrical vehicles from taking off.
  5. There are no organic strawberries at the store, but you promised to make strawberry cake so you have to buy conventional ones (in a plastic container).

Tell me CEO,  how are these eco-disasters my responsibility?

A few years ago we didn’t know we wanted tablets. Apple invented the I-pad, and suddenly consumers decided they needed one. Industry took the lead, consumers blindly followed suddenly not even remembering how life was before there were I-pads.

If only the industry would be as inventive when it comes to environmentally sustainable practices as it is when it comes to launching new products, the world would look quite different (excluding you Elon Musk!). Consumers all over would automatically buy the eco-friendly choice that was presented to them.

ACTION

Since I doubt that the industry will start acting all “eco” on their own (I just saw that Snapple now comes in a plastic bottle instead of glass! Snapple!!!) we, the conscious consumers, must again act and invest our enthusiasm and energy. This time into generating emails, tweets, posts and making calls. We must

  1. Urge our favorite brands to manufacture HERE.
  2. Tell our local grocer that we need more bulk bins.
  3. Convince clothing stores that receipts and printed coupons are so 1990.
  4. Ask our local eateries to ditch the straws and disposable kids’ cups.
  5. Go to the town hall meeting, demand better infrastructure.

Etcetera, etcetera. AND, of course, we must continue to vote with our dollars, by buying everything made right (here). Our 25% (or 50, whatever) does make a difference – I’ve blogged about us taking charge and changing the market, the industry (and the world) for three years.

It’s time for the industry to wake up, take responsibility and act.

We need to help them get started.

Who are you emailing today?

Five awesome vegan handbags – Made in USA

A while back I wrote a post about the environmental footprint of leather, saying we should buy less of it and buy better. Better in this case meaning locally sourced hides, vegetable tanned, high quality and handcrafted where you live.

But, then came the question; If we are to buy fewer leather bags – are there any durable, good-looking, made in USA, vegan handbags out there we can buy instead?

Of course.

When it comes to “pleather”, a plastic, leather-looking material, often found at H&M and Forever 21, I have one thing to say: no thanks. It breaks, it doesn’t look as good, and we don’t like plastic anyway, now do we? There is a new material in town though, Piñatex, which looks a lot like leather, is durable and also eco-friendly. Piñatex fibres are the by-product of the pineapple harvest so no extra land, water, fertilizers or pesticides are required to produce them. However, shops are not exactly overflowing with this material yet, and why if we don’t want leather would we have bags that look like leather?

I say screw that! Instead why not venture out and pick one of these five nothing-to-do-with-leather materials:

1. Cork

Cork is super sustainable and as it turns out, super stylish.

Did you know that a cork tree that has its bark removed every nine years will absorb up to five times as much CO2 as a tree that doesn’t? In other words using the cork is good for the tree, good for the environment and good for, mainly, Spain’s and Portugal’s economies.

One brand to keep in mind if you’re into the look and durability of cork, is Nest Pure. Handcrafted, high quality bags and accessories, made right here in Minnesota. In addition to the main material, cork, the bags come with various colors of organic cotton.

Nest Pure vegan cork clutch
I want this one!

2. Recycled Sails

It may sound like a bit of a stretch but old, no longer usable sails from boats become the most awesome tote bags up in Maine. You may have read my blog post a few weeks ago about Seabags of Maine and my new turtle tote? If not, check it out here for more details about this cool brand.

Seabags of Maine vegan handbag
Me and my bag.

PS. The fabrics are not really recycled, they’re “reused” :)

3. Cotton

What’s wrong with the look of cotton? Actually, nothing as far as I’m concerned! I’ve been sporting my cotton tote bag quite a bit on the blog actually.

Cotton is great because it’s natural, yet durable and easy to wash. (Organic cotton is obviously better for the environment than conventional cotton is, but let’s keep focusing on the vegan thing and just say cotton bags are cool!)

Brands to check out: Seltzer Goods (USA), MapTote (USA) and Morado Designs (organic, USA).

Maptote texas clutch
Love this print!

4. Waxed Canvas

Canvas is made from either linen, hemp or cotton – all natural materials – and make for durable fabrics when waxed. What about the wax you say? Well, yes, using beeswax means this fabric is not vegan, so I’m cheating a little, but it is still far from the eco-nightmare of leather. In my opinion, using beeswax makes much more sense than using a poly-based (fossil fuel) wax. But that’s just me.

Newton Supply Co. out of Austin, Texas, makes the cutest waxed canvas bags. (Some do come with natural color, veg-tanned leather details so look out for that.) This company is extra awesome because they’re partnered with Open Arms, a division of the Austin-based Multicultural Refugee Coalition which empowers refugee women by providing living wage employment. Cool.

Newton Supply Co Texas handbag
Oooh, I want this one too.

5. Seat Belts

It may be unusual, but yes, Harvey’s makes bags out of seat belts, in sunny California. There are endless styles, colors and sizes to chose from. My good friend has a backpack, which is lightweight, well made and sized “just right”.

Harvey's backpack vegan handbag
My friend with her cool blue bag.

The company started out using actual old seat belts, salvaged from broken cars, which was super sustainable! I’m pretty sure the current handbags are made from newly woven “seat belts” though. Still, this unusual “fabric” makes for a fun, vegan handbag.

6. Bonus Tip: If all else fails, go second hand

Here’s what, if you can’t stand carrying a purse that doesn’t look like leather or in fact IS made of leather, yet you’re not keen on another cow dying and more pollutants being released; second hand will be your saving grace. Mom’s or grandma’s closet is normally a great place to start browsing! It’s made, it’s there, give that leather bag a new home.

(And yes, I do know that a vegan would never go for option number 4 or 6, but not all leather-skipping readers are. It’s all about inspiration to shop differently ;))

Anyone still in the mood for a leather bag made in China??!

 

Six reasons why I’m on a Not Made in China Challenge

Things have changed in this world of ours since I started the Not Made in China Challenge in 2014. Most of these changes are good.

For starters, India and China are investing billions in renewable energy – wind, solar, hydro – more than any other nations. In addition to this, China is shutting down its last coal plant in Beijing in an effort to clear the air (switching to natural gas) for millions of Chinese living in the region. Developing countries all over the world are going from no electricity to solar powered life – skipping the burning of fuels all together. Good news.

Meanwhile Donald (aka the worst president ever) is leaving the Paris Climate Agreement and talking about bringing jobs back in the coal industry as part of his plan to “put America first”. Although coal is never going to happen (sorry Donny boy!), the fact that he’s pro the most polluting technology we have and doesn’t believe in climate change, is bad news.

So, does it still make sense, as a sustainable shopper, to be on a Not Made in China Challenge?

YES!

Of course I would say that – hello blog – but there are great reasons for it too. Here’s why I am on this challenge, and keeping at it in 2017 and beyond.

The President is all talk

We know by now that all the campaign promises made by the Republican candidate were just false. He is not doing anything to bring jobs back here, he is not even ensuring that his beloved pipelines are to be made with American steel. He may have come up with the “Made in America Week” which is a great initiative, but so far, NOTHING has been done to ensure more items are, or remain “made right here”. (Also leaving the Paris Climate Agreement and not investing in renewables would most likely create fewer jobs for Americans down the line.) He talked the talk, but as usual, it’s still up to us consumers to walk the walk. And as far as that goes, no policies have been put in place that would make it easier or more affordable for Americans to choose “Made in USA”.

The core of my Not Made in China Challenge is to support small businesses that use sustainable production practices and eco-friendly materials. That effort supports our local communities; the tax-paying entrepreneurs, makers, builders and artisans living here. (Supporting a small business might mean a family can afford health insurance when/if GOP takes it away!) Basically this challenge is about “Main Street not Wall Street”.

Environmental questions remain

Even though China is switching things up in the energy market, honoring the Paris Climate Agreement and talking about implementing a carbon tax (YES!), small rural factories are still powered by burning coal. Not only by pulling electricity from the coal fired grid, but many actually run their own, tiny furnaces which have no filters, no air cleaning catalyst (NOx being an issue) and low efficiency.

There’s also more to a healthy planet than a low carbon air. China, India and several other countries are still polluting their groundwater and surrounding oceans by uncontrolled wastewater from manufacturing. (So is America, I know, I know, but I find it easier to spot the businesses here who do that, like Georgia Pacific.)

The force is not with the workforce

I have yet to see a certified fair-trade item come out of China. What’s going on with decent wages and healthy workplaces? Not much, I’m afraid.

This is of course also true for many other places; India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Vietnam, Mexico, neighboring Latin American countries and even, dare I say it, we’ve got some sketchy California sweatshops too. Best to stay away from them all unless we’re talking about certified fair-trade, organic and/or small business/artisan style items we can trust. If it’s too cheap to be true (aka in the West as “A GREAT deal”) – someone suffered to make it.

The trade deficit

Our ginormous trade deficit with China isn’t shrinking. In fact, what we export most to the Chinese is AIR. Yep, empty containers are constantly heading across the ocean to pick up more “stuff” for bored Americans. How much are we talking? The trade deficit with China was almost FOUR BILLION DOLLARS in 2015, and it grows every year.

The issue here is that Chinese business men (and women!) are investing more than ever in the USA, buying land, real estate and factories as we speak. Basically China could soon “own the USA” thanks to you shopping at Bed, Bath and Beyond.

Transport hasn’t gone “clean”

There has not been any breakthroughs when it comes to shipping transport. Large container ships are still burning through barrel after barrel of fossil fuel shipping the above mentioned “stuff” and empty containers back and forth. Container ships remain a threat to marine mammals by interruption of sound waves and migration paths as well.

Honestly, it’s the easy way to shop less

Since most everything is imported, reading labels and tags so I can avoid “Made in China” means I can’t buy anything. I feel like this issue is so often forgotten when we talk about Climate Change and the environment. We can elect all the climate friendly politicians for Congress we want, but it won’t matter if we continue down this path of OVER-CONSUMPTION.

I’m not saying that a Not Made in China Challenge fits all, different rules work for different people. This works for me, and I am sure it would work for most suburban Americans with access to Target. 

So I’m staying on the challenge – I am thriving at it actually. Sure as hell doesn’t mean I don’t respect China and their efforts to act on climate change.

Buy less, buy local.

Main Street, not Wall Street.

PS: To find out more about what this challenge means to me, read my entire blog! (it’s fun I promise!) Or maybe start with reading my “About” page :)

 

Style of the summer: Fair-trade, 100% organic, made right (THERE!)

Despite being on a shop-local-misson, when it’s fair-trade and organic, I occasionally import. This summer, I decided to import a shirt.

After all, certified fair-trade initiatives must be supported and organic cotton growers in India must get paid. In fact, because of our purchases, they make a much better, safer living than farmers still growing conventional (pesticide-covered, fertilized, Monsanto seed) cotton.

Did you know that due to debt owed to the seed producer, one conventional cotton farmer commits suicide every eight hours in India? That’s three souls per day.

When we demand organic fabric, more and more farmers can make the transition to growing organic crops. Here’s a promising read about how growing organic cotton frees Indian families from the (GMO) debt traps, if you’re interested.

Back to the shirt.

Organic cotton PrAna Gina Top

A light, airy, plaid shirt from eco-friendly brand PrAna looks and feels just right for summer and my upcoming days at the office (going back to work soon!).

100% organic cotton, certified fair-trade, soft, great fit. Also, loving me some great bonus details such as the green stitching on just one of the button holes and a hidden pocket on the right side. I paid $47 for this shirt (sale price!) at our very favorite co-op REI right here in Houston.

Fair trade organic cotton pink plaid shirt

Organic is cool.

Oh, and you might be wondering how much I’ve shopped this year, since I’ve written posts about a few new things lately! In addition to this shirt I’ve gotten a new eco-friendly bag ($160/USA/recycled fabric), a handmade scarf ($55/USA/organic), black tights ($10/USA/cotton) and a well made t-shirt ($36.50/USA/cotton). Five things in six months – that’s pretty good!

I’m wearing a size XS of the “Gina Shirt”, I’m 5’8″, 140’ish lbs.

Vacation, vacation, vacation: dealing with the aftermath (+ back to blogging!)

It’s been a bit quiet on the blog lately because 1. Vacation in Europe with baby and 2. Vacation in Europe without wifi. Yes, there are still places without it! (I did manage to publish one blog post about my new eco-friendly bag which I photographed i Denmark. Check it out here if you missed it :) )

Now, when it comes to vacationing, or traveling if you will, dealing with the guilt of flying is always hard. This activity, which I always try to undertake responsibly (have a great reason to go, travel zero waste) and rarely, is certainly the most unsustainable thing I do. One return trip to Sweden in economy class adds 1.28 metric tons of carbon to my yearly carbon footprint which is a lot. So what to do?

The easy and obvious thing to do is to carbon compensate, which I can do directly thru KLM’s website when buying the ticket (more on that in this post from last year) and/or by planting trees at Stand for Trees. This trip I realized that I could actually “compensate more” by collecting items abroad for baby August to bring home with me. That’s only previously used items – otherwise no point!

You’d be amazed what friends and family are hiding away in closets and are dying to get rid of. Because the people “donating” to me are my closest friends, not only do they have things I want, like and need, but also aren’t offended when I say no (aka “why’d you buy that?”). Most importantly they feel great about giving, they don’t have to spend money to spoil our baby, and together we prevent waste and reduce new material being purchased.

In addition to friends’ used (perfectly awesome) stuff, I also got my hands on a few of my own childhood items (sorting boxes at dad’s) which thrills me so.

The CO footprint of each and every thing I collected probably can’t be found on google, however I know it takes lots of energy, oil, resources and chemicals to produce just one new plastic cup. 

I like lists, so here is one of everything we brought home with us for baby August’s current and future endeavors!

  1. Lots of clothes 
  2. A pair of shoes
  3. A teether that goes in the freezer
  4. Three reusable squeeze pouches for baby food
  5. 10+ Spoons
  6. Four Plates
  7. Eight Bowls
  8. Three Cups
  9. Two baby bottles (not pictured – in the sink!)
  10. Two cans of baby food (my friend’s baby never got to!)
  11. A reflector
  12. Mini flounder for bath time (mine from 1989!)
  13. 20+ Children’s books in Swedish and Danish
  14. Eight baby books
  15. 13 Mini (pixi) books
  16. Five puzzles (one not pictured)
  17. Bib that catches food
  18. Pear-shaped mold for playing in sand
  19. Soft toy reindeer (which baby loves!)  

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Long list right? All of these things aren’t need-to-haves perhaps, but most are! How much carbon would I emit if I were to buy all of these items new?

I’m not sure, but not having to do so makes me feel better about those long fossil fuel burning flights we took. And, it IS more fun to have previously loved things :)

Now, vacation is over, I’m back to blogging (some fun posts coming up!), enjoying my last few weeks of maternity leave and, of course, living it green in Texas.