Monthly Archives: October 2016

How one woman (ME!) is reclaiming ‘Made in the USA’

I believe most bloggers write in order to inspire change, share important information or simply to brighten someone’s day with an uplifting post. As for me, you all know I write with the hopes that my posts will inspire readers and friends to make easy, eco-friendly changes in their lives. No one has to be perfect, but surely there are things all of us can improve upon.

The most exciting thing when you’re a blogger is when someone finds you in this cyber universe and let’s you know that they enjoy what you’re writing about! Awesomely, The Alliance of Americans for America (aoafa.com) approached me a while ago and asked if they could write an article about me and my efforts towards green-living and buying made in USA on their blog. Of course I said “YES!”.

A few weeks later, they posted a very nicely written article on their website, beginning with:

“Every single one of us is faced with making thousands of decisions every day. But what if instead of going through the motions, you made conscious choices – even the smallest changes – to positively impact the economy and the environment?

YES! They certainly “got it”. I was super excited to read what they wrote because even though their site evolves around American manufacturing and bringing jobs home, they talked quite a bit about the environmental aspects of my blog too, like how I aim to buy ethically made, zero waste products and how I believe we all can make simple changes to live more sustainably. Another YES!

Houston-based lifestyle blogger, Anna, decided to create made right (here), a website detailing her journey committing to these choices. In January of 2014, Anna realized she’d had enough of America’s overconsumption of cheaply and unethically made goods. She began The Not Made in China Challenge, swearing off all products manufactured in China, and vowing to buy eco-friendly, ethical, zero-waste, and American-made products whenever possible.”

“Common themes across categories include reducing consumption, checking tags for product and shipping information, and using just what you need – not what you want. By making small adjustments in each of these areas, Anna says, we can reduce our carbon footprint and help the planet.”

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I don’t have a very big audience, yet a GREAT one (thank YOU for reading!) so to get an article published about made right (here) was super awesome :)

If you’re up for it, you can read the entire post HERE.

Five easy ways to cut back on your dairy consumption (for the sake of your health!)

Yes, dairy.

I first started to cut back on my own dairy consumption in an attempt to reduce acne and breakouts and it worked, however this post is going to be about the cancer building properties of animal based foods, focusing on dairy.

Processed foods, refined sugars, air pollution and chemicals found in cleaning products and lotions all help cancer tumors grow. This is somewhat accepted knowledge by now, but no-one seems to want to talk about the effects that meat and dairy have on our bodies*.

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Why is dairy so bad for us? Well, we consume a lot of it, and most importantly, the main protein (casein) found in milk, has proven to be an extremely potent fuel in firing up cancer cells, especially for liver, breast and prostate cancer.

A series of lab tests, for example, using rats, concluded that when cancer genes (or clusters) are present, a diet consisting of 20% dairy protein in fact grows the cancer, while a diet with 5% doesn’t. Switching from a 20% dairy diet down to a 5%, actually stops the growth and even reduces the tumor over time!

It doesn’t matter how organic, local or non-gmo your dairy products are – the building blocks are the same. You’ll think twice about that organic, “all natural” strawberry milk you put in your kids’ lunch box now, I hope.

And sit back and think about this for a second: why would breast milk, by nature designed for another mammal, be good for humans? Do we aim to grow at the rate of a baby cow? We’re the only species on this earth that steals and uses breast milk from another. Awful! Rude!** 

Now, let’s take action.

1. Change your milk.

There are lots of great options to diary, like organic almond, cashew, coconut, oat and soy milk. I promise neither you nor your kids will get sick from protein deficiency. Ask your doctor how many patients he sees for lack of protein in a year (none). Don’t worry about the calcium either, osteoporosis is most common in high dairy consuming countries (like USA and Sweden). Due to the high acidity in animal products the body actually uses our bones’ calcium (a base) to naturalize that acid, meaning the more dairy we consume, the weaker our bones.

2. Change your ice-cream and yoghurt 

Organic coconut milk ice-cream and yoghurt is like the best thing that ever happened to me. Try Nada Moo or So Delicious varieties. Your kids will LOVE this.

3. Change your sautee and frying base

Please note that I am not in any way a promoter of synthetic margarine or high fat oils! Personally I use mostly organic olive oil for any satueeing action. Recently I found a brand made right here in Texas. Shop around, find a vegan option you like, and use scarcely. 

4. Change your sandwich base

Peanut butter, almond butter, olive oil, hummus, avocado, tomatoes… so many foods are delicious on a piece of bread. Still, if you feel you need a sandwich basic, instead of using cream cheese or butter go for vegan mayo. There are lots of great versions, we use Just Mayo from Hampton Creek which comes in a gigangtic jar that lasts forever and saves packaging.

5. Just Cut back!

Sure, I’ll have a pizza and won’t reject a meal with dairy in it at mom’s house. It’s about reducing! Always opt for light or no cheese and skip it all together on bean burgers, fajitas, fries and other foods that don’t “need it”. Learn to enjoy your tea and coffee black. Have your pie without the ice-cream. Get it?

Our bodies are amazing and want to be healthy. Once you remove the constant fuel to the fire, they can handle a slice of cheesecake now and then. (This philosophy also applies to meat y’all.) A plant-based, whole foods diet is the best thing you can feed your body for longterm health (and beauty!).

Please continue to support cancer research with any means you want and can afford. (Just don’t buy useless merchandise!) We still need to find cures. But also remember to create awareness about diet based disease prevention.

Tell your friends and family about the effects of animal based proteins! Do your own research when it comes to disease vs. meat and dairy consumption (it’s a click away) or set up a screening at your house of the Forks over Knives movie (it’ll tell you everything you need to know and it’s on Netflix!).

In addition to all the positive changes to your body’s strength and health, our environment will also thank you for reducing your dairy consumption. Dairy cows fart and burp methane (greenhouse gas), use endless resources (grains, water, lands) and create much more waste per head than humans do.

Got milk?

*Refer to The China study.

**Dairy cows actually have a miserable life, separated from their babies only hours after birth, constantly artificially impregnated while living in small booths for three to four years until they become low grade hamburger meat.

Growing belly, shrinking closet (planning ahead and making do)

Because I am always looking for a reason not to shop, I decided that in order to buy as few maternity outfits as possible, I had to start by going through my closet to see what items I already had that could possibly work for a while, or come along for most of the baby-baking ride.

What I’ve learned so far is that although a pair of maternity jeans is needed, many pieces of clothing in my closet actually work! Any loose fitting, jersey or stretchy tops still fit and since I’ve always preferred soft dresses with straight lines (no specific waist line), I was happy to discover that I actually have quite a few that will help me look super cute and put together this fall (fingers crossed). I just needed one little thing to rock some of these dresses in the office.

Tights!

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Made in USA, eco-friendly, small business, black tights to be more exact. How lucky am I that the perfect pair happened to be just a google search away?

Introducing Storq. A California based maternity-wear brand that makes simple, no-squeeze basics and intimates for all growing bellies and changing bodies.

Each piece is made in USA; more specifically, it’s knitted, dyed, cut and sewn in Los Angeles, all within a 10-mile radius. All labels are screen printed using PVC-free, water-based ink and are sewn flat or printed on the fabric so nothing irritates the skin.

Many Storq products, just like the tights ($60), are made of 95% lenzing modal, a CO2-neutral fiber that comes from sustainably harvested Austrian beech wood forests and 5% spandex for stretch. (I recently promoted modal in my guide to eco-friendly fabrics too.)

My new tights are unbelievably soft and luxurious! They can be worn pulled up, over the belly, or folded down to sit at the hip. Houston is still kind of hot so I am wearing them low.

They’re meant to work for growing bodies, all nine months, and although I haven’t quite “grown into” my tights yet, they never slide down or become uncomfortable. It is a solid design, made by women who know how maternity wear should fit and function.

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Since I was already buying the tights online I decided to throw in a nursing bra while I was at it. I figured I might not run into many planet-friendly, made in USA, soft, no underwire bras, so I better strike when I see one. It stretches and is super comfy, just like the tights. Actually, I can’t find a reason why not all women, pregnant or not, wouldn’t love this bra! ($42)

I’m still counting these two items as my one new thing purchased in October. ONE SET of undergarments. See? ;)

A little eco-bonus is that Storq knows how annoying is it for women to invest in a temporary pregnancy wardrobe, therefore they have partnered with a recycling company, 2ReWear, to help us recycle anything we can’t give to a friend or use again. All we have to do is contact them and mail our things.

Check them out at Storq.com

Ps. The tunic I’m wearing has become my favorite bump-friendly dress. Believe it or not, I bought it in 2004! The shoes are US-made Oka-Bs and the tote is also US-made from Seltzer Goods.

Pictures by Shutterluv by Ashley.

How to have an eco-friendly Halloween (sort of)

Halloween is approaching fast and once again stores and empty warehouses are filling up with one time use (plastic) made in China crap. Yes, it’s my least favorite holiday.

Last year I wrote a rant trying to stop America from celebrating, and as you probably guessed, that didn’t work out at all! (Imagine my surprise!) So, I thought this year, instead I should share some eco tips that could help create a little bit less Halloween environmental horror.

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Let’s talk costumes. My hope is that you won’t be part of the above statistic and instead opt to use last year’s costume or borrow one from a friend. If not, the obviously green and budget friendly choice for all is second hand shopping! I promise, it is way less scary than it sounds.

The best time to get Halloween costumes is most likely well in advance so if you’re still looking, here are some ideas for costumes that you will most likely find at the thrift center, second hand shop or even at home (your own or someone else’s!)

1. Tarzan. All you need is a piece of cloth.
2. Crazy cat lady or weird family member. Dig up a bad sweater and fuzzy pants.
3. Represent a decade like 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s. Thrift stores are full of good options! I feel like characters from the Stranger Things series would be an awesome choice this year. Works great for families that want to match each other too.
4. Pregnant lady. Get a big dress, fake a belly.
5. Dead person. Wear anything just go wild with dead-looking make up.

You get the idea – just go digging in those piles and racks for inspiration! And if you need more inspiration on what to be, ethical shopping and the costumes you might already have at home, check out Going Zero Waste’s awesome list HERE. (And pssst. Newborns and babies don’t know it’s halloween, so don’t spend money and earthly resources on dressing them up! Get over your need to do this all while saying “the kids love it”. Erm. Below and above certain ages – no they don’t. This also applies to MANY husbands.)

Then there are the treats, the decorations, the parties, the food. Dios mío, so much to do! Maybe it’s because I grew up in Europe that I “just don’t get it” and a good blogger knows when she’s been beat.

I read a great blog post the other day on this exact topic and I decided to share that post with you instead of reinventing the wheel (smart!). Katy’s got tips for an eco-friendly, zero waste Halloween and you can read all about it HERE.

Just look at her fab fall décor ideas! (Yes, collected in her yard)

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If you did decide to not celebrate this year OR managed to buy nothing new, please leave me a comment below (yay!).

Naturally, I will not be celebrating. I’ll spend zero dollars, create zero waste, not contribute to kiddo sugar rushes and be utterly satisfied and happy in my life anyway. But that’s just me.

Not made in China challenge just got serious (an announcement!)

The majority of people that tell me that they could never do a “Not Made in China Challenge” are mothers. Their kids grow like weeds and need lots of clothes and it’s impossible to not get them things (toys, gear, shoes) made in China.

Here’s the thing though. A not made in China Challenge with a zero tolerance for Chinese-made goods is impossible for all people who live in a western, digital world. Yes, one can make it a year or two with zero purchases (just look at me!) but there will come a time when a new security camera, phone, kitchen appliance, extension cord or computer is “needed” and one has to accept a sweatshop-made, imported product.

But when it comes to the mamas, I can’t help but think that if they really wanted to, they could do it. Minus the electronics mentioned above of course. Couldn’t they shop second hand? Couldn’t they just not shop SO much?

Interestingly enough, I am about to find out for myself.

I’m about to find out if the Not Made in China Challenge is indeed IMPOSSIBLE with a kid or if it’s just a matter of priorities. Being a natural born skeptic who tends to “always be right”, I can’t wait to find out what the deal is (and prove y’all wrong! Ha!).

I do foresee remote controlled cars and Legos in our future though, items made partly (or fully) in China. But apart from those two things, why wouldn’t I be able to make this work? I am super motivated!

That said, I have NO idea where baby things are made, so I may be in for a rude awakening.

Yes, this is probably the weirdest pregnancy announcement you’ll read this week! But I am excited to finally share the news of our new family member coming this spring. There’ll undoubtedly be some maternity wear on the blog, as well as more things “baby” (though I’ll be careful not to bore you!). Hopefully I’ll get to expand my list of kids gear and fashions too, with lots of cool, ethical, eco-friendly, made in USA brands.

I’m ending with a picture of me and the invisible little one (minus cheesy baby balloons) to really nail this announcement thing.

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