Tag Archives: christmas tree

How to be an eco-friendly holiday joy spreader this season

The Holiday Season is one slippery slope of OVER CONSUMPTION. Decorations, cookies, candles and (ugly) sweaters calling from all aisles to all easily persuaded shoppers.

Of course the beauty of it all is that you don’t have to say no to holiday spirit and fun just because you say no to consuming ridiculous amounts of carbon emissions, sweatshop made goods, corn syrup, meat, artificial colors and gimmicks this season.

In order to kick off the season right, here are four holiday posts I have written previously about mastering this time of year in an eco-friendly, low consumption, sustainable way.

1. How to not be a consumption slave on Black Friday

Can I please try to persuade you to NOT shop this year? Look around you, you don’t need anything! Some food for thought in this post.

2. How to master the art of stress free gifting

For kids or adults, follow these easy steps for immediate success (and saving dough!)

3. How to decorate an eco-friendly Christmas tree

Read all about what’s better; a real or a artificial tree and how we did it in 2014 to keep it budget friendly, eco-friendly and not made in China.

4. How to master gift wrapping the eco way

Kind of self-explanatory, but here’s the key; reusable wrapping: good, disposable wrapping: bad. If you just remember that line, you’ll be fine.

Despite me being a bit of a Grinch, I think we will be celebrating this year. We do have four days off work, and with the belly growing I don’t think a trip would be a smart way to spend the holidays. I’ll be better off on the couch drinking spiced (non alcoholic) wine (Glogg) and eating ginger snaps.

glogg

I’ll be posting some great ideas for environmentally friendly and ethical gifts in the coming weeks as well. If you decide to shop for Christmas, I know you want to do it right.

But first, if you’re not staying in or opting to spend the weekend outside, remember this Saturday is Shop Small Saturday. A day to focus on supporting locally owned, small, neighborhood businesses. Vote with your dollars – shop items made right (here).

Happy Thanksgiving! :)

Oh Christmas tree, oh Christmas tree… when disposable beats reusable

It’s that time of year again when we all start talking about Christmas. Christmas plans, Christmas wishes, Christmas time off from work, Christmas weight gain, Christmas spending…

My husband and I don’t do the gifting every year and we probably have less than 10 Christmas decorations, but I actually love this holiday! For me, it’s all about cooking, listening to music, being all around cozy and drinking spiced hot wine (“Glögg”). Favorite Christmas album? Destiny’s Child’s 8 days of Christmas. Sassy harmonies combined with jingle bells – sign me up! (And give hubby a pair of ear-plugs.)

It's the real deal.
It’s the real deal.

Now, let’s talk Christmas trees!

Did you know that the most eco-friendly choice is to buy a real tree each year, instead of buying and reusing an artificial one?

A Swedish nonprofit I follow, the Nature Protection Organization, published an article about it last year, which is where I first read about it.

Before your go “hurray” and head on over to Wal-Mart’s parking lot, there are a few constraints to consider. You need to make sure your tree was grown sustainably, preferably organic, and comes from a nearby, healthy forest (or farm). You’ll probably have most luck shopping with a small vendor or straight from the owner to assure that you’re getting a happy tree.

The tree should then be cut and composted, used for heating (if you have a high efficiency furnace) or collected by the municipality for use as heating material or be composted, large scale, when the season is over.

Unless someone in the family is allergic, a real tree is also a safe choice for your home.

Taking a closer look at the option, an artificial tree, there are several (obvious) reasons as to why this type of tree is worse for the environment than the real one. First, the artificial, plastic Christmas tree was transported here from far away; most often from China, may have been manufactured un-ethically and generally contains chemicals.  It comes wrapped in plastic, inside a cardboard box with ink on it (waste!). And when it’s time to get a new one, should it get old and worn, it’s not recyclable and ends up in landfill (waste!). Even if you use it for as long as 10 years, a real, locally grown, sustainable tree, should still be better.

There’s an exception; if you already own a plastic tree, of course, using that one again is the best choice!

We had guests for Christmas last year so we said yes to the mess of decorating our house (a little). We went with a real tree, obviously, which we picked out at the local farmers’ market. We decorated it with homemade paper decorations, popcorn string, Mardi Gras beads, the few ornaments we already had, and the main attraction was a colorful string of lights from Taiwan. I’ve never been into the multi-colored lights but it was the ONLY box of lights I could find not made in China! See, this challenge is forever pushing my boundaries of style.

This year, it may just be the two of us for Christmas and we haven’t decided if we’re having a tree or not, yet. If we are, we will do a style-repeat from last year since it was such a looker!

What do you think? Artificial or real?

Picking out the tree. Notice the wonderful "Christmas weather" #Houston
Picking out the tree. Notice the wonderful “Christmas weather” #Houston
Making the popcorn string took a long time!
Making the popcorn string took a long time!
Wow, look at them classy lights! Ella & Ben are very cute though, and I spy American made New Balance sneakers in the background.
Wow, look at them classy lights! Ella & Ben are very cute though, and I spy American made New Balance sneakers in the background.

My Swedish (speaking) readers can read the article HERE.