Tag Archives: plant based

Five surprising ways a plant-based diet has improved my life!

A newly published study in Science Magazine concluded that switching to a vegan diet (from an all-inclusive one) is the single most effective way to reduce ones environmental impact*. Diet change is more powerful than for example switching to green electricity or electrifying travel, because it doesn’t just tackle greenhouse gases but also reduces ocean acidification, agricultural land use and water consumption. The study included data from 40,000 farms in 119 countries.

When I transitioned to a plant-based lifestyle (from vegetarian + sometimes fish or chicken), I did so because of climate change sure, but mostly because of the health benefits and my personal need to clear my perioral dermatitis. Little did I know that changing my family’s diet would improve my life in a bunch of other ways too! Turns out, there are a few surprising benefits to plant-based living that truly enhances quality of life. At least I think so. Read on and then tell me what you think about these five amazing changes I’ve discovered!

benefits of vegan diet

1. Bye, bye gross bacteria

Here’s something amazing and convenient that comes with plant-based living: your trash doesn’t smell. Think about how fast your trashcan goes sour and gross after you toss a Styrofoam tray in there with meat juice on it. After just one day (tops) you have to empty the whole bin. (Since, you know, meats are forbidden in the compost). There’s another benefit to this bacteria thing as well: dirty chopping boards and having the toddler “help” in the kitchen is suddenly no big deal. I know that even if we miss a spot, the “chickpea residue” (lol) will not pose a health threat to any of us. Kids can lick their fingers after helping you out without any risks. If they drop the spatula on the floor, no biggie. Plus, you can taste the bean patties when raw to check if they need more salt. This is a TRUE win.

2. Bathroom breaks are FAST

Let me put it this way; you won’t be seeing any magazines in a vegan family’s bathroom. Because every time plant-eaters consume protein they also consume FIBER, bellies and intestines are generally super happy which means no constipation. Meat is also tough on your belly flora and stays inside you much longer than plant foods do. I hate public restrooms with huge openings around the door, so if I can shorten my time in there; mega win.

3. Serious savings

If you are like me, someone who shops at the grocery store, prefers organic and natural foods and cooks most meals at home, you’ll save money ditching animal products. Soy milk costs the same as organic cow’s milk. Legumes (beans, lentils) are much cheaper per pound than meat is. The savings add up even more when you consider legumes are often sold in a dry state. Did you know one cup dry lentils becomes almost three cups when cooked? Ca-ching! Also at restaurants, vegetarian and vegan meals cost less than that steak or seafood dinner. Every time.

4. More varied menu

How often did we really eat cauliflower steaks before going plant-based? How many fun salads did I actually make? Did we ever reap the benefits of nutritional yeast? The answer is no. Heck, I didn’t even eat squash regularly! I have invited so many new foods into my life since I started to cook vegan, which is what ultimately lead to my love affair with lentils.

5. Learning commitment by limited selections

This may not sound like an amazing benefit, but I tell you, ordering food at restaurants has never been easier. Sure, there are a few places where I can’t eat anything which is kind of inconvenient but in most places there are a few vegan options. And by a few, I mean two. Tops. This is what makes it so easy! Even at the Cheesecake factory where the menu is a thick as a bible, it takes me two seconds to flip to the “superfoods” section and pick the vegan cobb salad. Often, if a menu offers little or no options, combining two or three side dishes will do the trick.

How does those sound?! Great benefits if you ask me.

*A note from me: I am all about “do what you can” – also when it comes to diets. Every vegan meal matters, even if you are not 100% vegan. I call myself plant-based, not vegan, because cheese and leather sneakers, but most meals I cook are 100% vegan.

Lentil patties that’ll make meat lovers wanna go vegan! (or at least lick their plates)

Lentils are amazing. Filling, cheap ($2/pound dry), often available in bulk and full of protein (26% by weight) and fiber (31%). I never knew how amazing they really were, until I went plant-based and started experimenting making new vegan recipes.

Lentils are part of the legume family and Canada produces about 50% of the world’s lentils. Superfood and grown close – score.

vegan lentil patties vegan biffar

One of the ways lentils totally impress omnivores (and recently converted vegans) is by their ability to substitute hamburger meat (ground beef) in almost all recipes. Taco filling, lasagna, minestrone soup, pasta sauce, you name it. Speaking of which, you can find my recipe for vegan, Swedish moussaka (lentil and potato casserole) on Mother Earth Living Blog right now :) (Go check me out!!)

Today I am sharing another Swedish recipe for abso-lentil-ly delicious vegan, lentil patties or what my husband calls “vegadeller”.

First let me tell you that these are not easy to fry just right. Contrary to meat patties, burgers or steaks, heat doesn’t travel the same way within plants. There’s no browning the outside surface first and then waiting for the patty to slowly heat and cook “automatically” (chicken grill-masters know what I am talking about). Nope, you have to saute them super slooooow, in an abundance of oil. I’ve failed multiple times and made lentil crumbles… Luckily they taste amazing like that too ;)

Here’s what you need for 8-10 vegadeller:

  • 2 small carrots, shredded
  • 1 medium sized yellow onion, chopped (really fine)
  • 1/2 cup dry lentils (mixed types work well)
  •  0.4 cups flour (gluten-free mix or regular)
  • 1 tbsp bread crumbs and 1 tbsp water
  • salt, paprika, garlic powder to taste (vegan food is safe to taste uncooked!)
  • oil

Here’s what you do:

  • Rinse and boil the lentils in water; 25-30 minutes will make them soft and mashable with a fork. Rinse in colander after boiling.
  • Mix the bread crumbs with water, let sit. It should turn into a “paste” after just a few minutes. Add more crumbs if consistency is runny, more water if dry. This paste helps “bind” the patties.
  • If you haven’t already shredded carrots and chopped the onion, do it!
  • Mash the lentils with a fork and mix them with carrots, flour, crumbsy-paste and spices. Add onion bit by bit. Too much onion or too big chunks of onion will make the patties fall apart so stay on the safe side. We want a sticky mash-up.
  • Form 1.5″-2″ diameter patties. It’s ok if they are different sizes, just try to make them similar thickness and quite flat (thin) for easier cooking.
  • Heat the pan to low-medium heat, add oil to cover the bottom and saute sloooow and carefully. As you cook them, add oil so they don’t stick. Yes, it’ll take a while but don’t stress them. THIS IS KEY for success.

I like to serve vegadeller with roasted potatoes, veggies and vegan bearnaise sauce (which we personally import ready-made from Sweden) or with cold (vegan) potato salad for summer. Let me know if you need a recipe!

One last word: If you can’t get the center of the patties to cook (they seem mashy and raw) turn down heat, give them more time or chop them up in anger with your spatula; also known as “you just made lentil crumbles”. You can use your tasty crumbles as salad topping (the potato salad you made will work!), in soup, on pizza. They freeze well also and are delicious. Then, please give the recipe another try. Play around with the ratios of ingredients and the heat in your skillet. Like I said, I’ve failed at this recipe too. They’re worth some practice though :)

Gluten-free, vegan, full-of-seeds Swedish crispy bread (my first ever blog recipe!)

Last week was crazy busy and I didn’t have time to compose anything fantastic for the blog, hence no posting. Busyness is still going strong, mainly at work (not that I would ever blog during work hours!) so let me just share a quick post of my very favorite recipe for vegan, gluten-free, crunchy, fantastic crispbread – which I keep making over and over again.

First, what is crispbread? It’s what you get when you translate “Knäckebröd” say the Swedes. Actually, it is a sort of large cracker which is served as a bread; it can take any toppings you like and is packed with fiber. This crispbread is made up of mostly seeds, instead of wheat flour, which makes it super nutrient packed! Let’s just mention pumpkin seeds with their 32% protein (by weight) and flax seeds which has vital Omega 3 fatty acids for veganistas.

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This recipe is low waste as well; I can get all the seeds and the almond meal in bulk. I do get the arrowroot in plastic and the oil in a glass bottle which I can recycle.

What you need:

  • 4 parts pumpkin seeds (I use a mix of raw and roasted-salted)
  • 2 parts sunflower seeds (raw)
  • 1 part flax seeds (raw)
  • 2 parts flour (I use 50/50 arrowroot flour and almond meal)
  • 1 part canola oil*
  • 4 parts boiling water
  • A sprinkle of sea salt as you see fit (needed if you’re using only raw seeds)

1 part is defined as 1 deciliter (dl), 1/3 cup or 1/2 cup. It’s not so much the amount, but the ratio. I use a total of 7 dl of seeds and it makes two 14.5″ x 11″ (37 x 27 cm) pan’s worth. This batch size (in dl) lasts me about a week; I love snacking on this bread and hubby always offers to help finish it.

If you happen to have other seeds at home (sesame, poppy, chia etc.) feel free to substitute as you like!

What you do:

  1. Mix all the dry ingredients in a bowl
  2. Pour in the oil and boiling water
  3. Set the oven to 305F (150C)
  4. Stir, and let batter sit for 15 minutes (it will go from watery to sticky!)
  5. Spread out on parchment paper** on the pan as thin as you like (the thinner the better and crunchier!)
  6. Bake for around 1 hour and 15 minutes
  7. Let cool on a rack (it cools super fast)
  8. Break apart and enjoy!

That’s it!

If anyone tries to make this seedy crispbread please let me know how it turned out! And since this is my first recipe ever I’d love to hear if my instructions and information is sufficient. Stepping into unknown territory here.

Now, go make yourself some crispbread :)

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This bread was a bit too thick but a nice picture nonetheless :)

* You can play around with the ratio of water to oil to reduce oil consumption. I’ve made it before using about half of what is in the recipe. Try it and see how you like it.

** A waste reduction tip is to save the paper for next time. I use mine over and over. No problems what so ever. I have also used the same sheets for other oven-baked breads.

Thoughts and ramblings about raising plant based children

I was brought up eating meat like most children are.

The first time I went fishing with my dad, a friend of his and my sister, I started crying when we caught the first fish. I couldn’t believe we were going to kill it and that I had contributed to its death. It broke my heart. The little mermaid was my favorite movie after all. I was told I was a party-pooper.

The first time I fried bacon at my mom’s house I almost fainted. The memory is so vivid. What was puttering in the pan looked incredibly gross to me. I kept telling myself that it wasn’t and that no one else faints when frying bacon! I did eat bacon when someone else cooked it. I got through it, resting on a chair during the frying and of course was later told I was being ridiculous. “It’s bacon.”

So I toughened up.

10 years later I had learned to distance myself from what I was cooking and dealing with enough to even roll meatballs. I became a pretty good cook.

Most people eat meat because most people eat meat. I don’t judge my parents (or any other parents) for raising omnivore kids; society shapes us and our actions. Nevertheless, now a mom myself I’ve given this a lot of thought and come to the conclusion that I’m not really okey with us serving flesh to children.

A child’s natural instinct is to love animals. To play with them and cuddle them. Young children, who hasn’t been taught differently yet, don’t differentiate between a dog and a pig – who’s the friend and who’s dinner – they’re both worthy of the same love. Who wants Babe to be eaten anyway? Raise you hand!

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Borrowed this picture from Veganstreet.com 

I never thought I’d “go vegan”. I quit (most) meat due to environmental reasons but had never before “Cowspiracy”, seen any reason to do that or to be vegetarian either; the vegetarians I knew did not appear healthy with diets based on sugar, carbs, dairy and popcorn. I finally went 100% plant based due to health reasons and now as an adult knowing it was the right thing to do with the information I had at hand. Honestly though, I still struggle with truly finding empathy for the billions of animals that are being killed every year and understanding the actual horror of slaughter. Society has shaped me to be a hypocrite, no doubt. Maybe you feel the same way.

However, when I ask myself the hard questions and really take the time to consider them, the only answer I can come up with is the ethical one. Would I be okey with killing a pig myself to eat it? No. Is it fair to take baby cows away from their mothers at birth so I can consume dairy? No. Should beings of earth be tortured for profit? No. Do I support an ocean depleted of sea creatures? No. Yet, there is a brain-heart-disconnect. I wish to not give my child the same.

When he is old enough to understand that chicken nuggets are fluffy 7 week old chicks with breading, he can make the decision if he want to eat them. Babies don’t understand what meat is and if they did they’d say “What the fuck mom!? Are we eating Nemo/Babe/Sebastian/Donald!? Why??” Parents don’t have an answer. Anyone looking forward to explaining where sausage comes from?

Because most people eat meat and society has taught us that protein, calcium and iron must come from animals, some publications and folks believe that a plant based kid is malnourished. I don’t believe that at all; in fact it I know it is not true.

I am not an expert or a nutritionist (though in this day and age that doesn’t guarantee anything either!) but I’ve read a good book on optimizing baby’s nutrition and I follow several blogs on plant based family living. Common sense tells me that the “regular” American kid who is brought up on Mac and cheese, nuggets, pb&j, hot dogs and the occasional fruit and carrot is not a well-nourished kid. Yet, society appears to be fine with that diet!?! Ever read the kids menu at a restaurant? Nothing but fat, animal protein and white bread.

B12 is the only vitamin a vegan truly must add to their diet. Animals get it added to their food or they absorb it while consuming bacteria (dirt) if they roam free. So we basically need to do the same: supplement in food or eat dirt! (That’s a joke, we supplement.) Baby will take vitamin D and B12 (after he quits formula all together, which has it) and he just started loving our unsweetened, organic, fortified soy milk with calcium and B12.

As with all Utopian scenarios or ideals, our kid’s diet won’t be perfect. I won’t be that parent who denies my child birthday cake or pizza at a party because it has milk in/on it. He will eat the occasional pancake made with eggs and ice cream I’m sure. (Meat might happen on some occasion as well. I don’t know.) I do think that animal products like dairy and eggs are easier to explain to a child. I know there is A LOT of killing and suffering in these industries as well (maybe more) and it’s not healthy foods, but if people ate cheese only a few times a year we wouldn’t have the money to fund an industry of abuse and exploitation. We’d get the cheese from a local farmer who had a few grazing cows to maintain open landscape. (That’s land meant to be open not former rain forest mind you.) Idealistic and Utopian – I know – but explainable to my kid and makes life SO MUCH EASIER.

Daycare has worked with us and knows “August doesn’t get the meat”. In fact it was recently reveled that some of the teachers had had a taste of baby’s lunch box because it looks so delicious every day! They told my husband “he eats such good food!”

I don’t judge anyone’s eating habits (except the constant use of straws in people’s drinks, but that’s another subject) and I don’t blame myself or my parents for eating the way I did for 34 years.

Read this post with an open mind and remember:

Most people eat meat because most people eat meat.

Aside from culture and society’s dietary norms: Did Anna just drink the vegan kool-aid or what do you really think about it?

A final note. I am aware of rural communities and tribes who raise and consume animals for survival, who teach children respect and the circle of life. I love the Alaska homestead shows and “Naked and Afraid” where hunting equals survival; an only source for protein and fat. Just like I know there are Americans living in “food deserts” with only McDonald’s and gas station food available; they can’t go get the lentils and the multivitamins. I’m writing about me and the BILLIONS of other people who shop at the grocery store every week. What do we really think?

[Picture from Veganstreet.com – go support them in their efforts to educate!]

Anniversary post: Four years since I went “green” and changed my world (and maybe yours!)

Hi!

I’m Anna and I’m on a Not Made in China Challenge. Today happens to be my challenge anniversary! That’s right, four years ago today I pledged to stop over-consuming, stop supporting unethical fashion brands and to buy as much (%wise) made in USA items as possible.

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Hi there! This is me :)

This pledge started my journey towards green living. Before that, I thought recycling, bringing bags to the grocery store and supporting World Wildlife Foundation with a bit of cash each month was the definition of being “eco friendly”. Yes, we all start somewhere. (If you’re not even doing those things, take a minute and reflect.)

Every year since I started the challenge, I’ve taken different steps to lower my carbon footprint like starting a compost, switching cars, limiting my shopping, quitting beef, to name a few and this year is no different.

More specifically, in 2017 I have:

  • Gone plant based for real. Hardly any cheating, guys! My husband has joined in on it too – like 90% joined in. I am so proud and impressed by his actions.
  • Kept up with cloth diapering our bundle of cuteness and poop. (Update post coming soon!)
  • Joined the Sierra Club and Planet Parenthood as a monthly donor. So easy.
  • Shopped even less (for myself) than last year. How is that even possible?!
  • Seriously revamped my bathroom/beauty routine meaning fewer, only all natural products in mostly zero waste packaging. Daily make-up no more.

I’m proud of all my efforts but going plant based has been the best decision ever. It takes a lot of thought and motivation and I did cheat during the holidays because gingerbread and cheese. However, I recognize that going vegan is a work in progress just like the not made in China challenge was (and is), so I’m not too hard on myself. I’ll get there :)

So, have I failed my Not Made in China Challenge at all?

YES. Oh my god, yes.

Keeping a baby happy and healthy takes time and thought which leads to shortcuts. There’s been take out in styrofoam, some unnecessary driving around to keep baby asleep in the car, baby things I didn’t need (erhm, sorry not sorry) and also a few items MADE IN CHINA! [Insert panic emoji here.] Namely a high chair, a robot vacuum, backsplash tile, a rain cover for the car seat, a pack and go stroller and a new pod-free coffee maker (hallelujah Ninja!).

I know, I know. I’ve gotten more China items this year than I did for the past three combined!

I guess some years you “need” things and some years you don’t. Having a new baby I think automatically classifies 2017 as a year we did need stuff. (A coffee maker and a robot vacuum fall in that baby-category! They do! Both were Christmas gifts for ourselves.) I actually think we’ve done really well acquiring very, very few things of which most were made in USA, Fair Trade or second hand. Go us.

Best Nine 2017 Sustainableanna
Best nine on Instagram 2017. I absolutely love all these pictures!

2017. It’s been an interesting year. (Don’t get me started on Trump.) It’s been a busy year too for me; not just at home with baby but at work as well. I haven’t blogged as much as I wanted to (wrote 45 posts compared to 60 in 2016) but that’s ok. This green mama/manager/newly crowned vegan cook can’t do it all. (Hint, neither can you.)

I’m thankful for everyone reading, commenting, engaging, and sharing! Also, I am so happy and grateful that I get to inspire you and be a small part of your journey towards a greener life with less consumption, better choices, less meat and most importantly: increased awareness.

Stick around for 2018 why don’t you!? I promise to do my best to make you think, smile and learn.

Happy new year guys.

Here’s to another year on the challenge.

PS. Please, pretty please, share your small or big eco-successes you had in 2017 in the comments. That would make me and everyone reading super thrilled and pumped for the new year :)

How to master going Plant Based – when you have a life (Six quick tips!)

Switching to a plant based, whole foods (PBWF) diet from a “regular” one is super easy!

Said no one.

Ever.

I am a pretty determined lady, yet I will be the first to admit that changing your own and your family’s diet over night is a bit of a struggle. Not so much when it comes to the tasks at hand (find a recipe – make it – taste it) but in the acceptance and adjustment of appetite, taste and lifestyle.

I started my PBWF transformation about three months ago. At the time I was eating a 95% vegetarian diet; I had switched most dairy for plant based alternatives a long time ago and quit beef in 2015. However, I was eating chicken occasionally (when we got Chinese take out), cheese on pizza and eggs. It was a gluten heavy diet with a fair amount of processed foods. I wasn’t by any means a stranger to great vegan food and for a long time I’ve enjoyed cooking and shopping for healthy meals. To me, it was a planet-friendly diet, that didn’t compromise the comfort of my life.

Then came the health issues and I decided to go full on PBWF.

I’ve had ups and downs. Lost weight and cleared my skin. Cheated with cheese.

Either way; I have learned a lot and I want to share with you!! Here are SIX THINGS I’ve learned since going Plant Based, which I hope can help someone else in their transition to the MOST planet-, and health-friendly diet there is :)

1. Go easy on other eco/health/life goals

This is number one because it’s important.

No matter what anyone tells you, cooking from scratch with whole ingredients while reading new recipes takes time. If you are a master chef already, you’ll be good, but if you think making grilled-cheese is cooking, you’re in trouble. (Also, consider how much time you’ll spend figuring out what toppings to put on sandwiches!) Now that I have committed to guiding  my wonderful family through a transition to a PBWF lifestyle, you might be wondering how I make time. Well, I go easy on other things. Hell no there’ll be no cleaning. Do I ever work out? NO. I am not zero-wasting this thing either. This mama can’t be making her own waste-free hummus and bake crackers in order to have an after work snack. I am also not exactly the social butterfly, I like being home. (My situation is I work full time as a project manager, I have a 10 month old, a husband, a house and a blog.) No matter your lifestyle, with a new diet, there is no time for shitty commitments. Or Facebook. Let them slide.

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A balanced, vegan diet. Fancy.

2. Soups are your new (best) friends

I am the kind of cook who freaks out if there are too many steps to a recipe, that’s why I love making soup. Measure, wash, chop and in the pot it goes. Try this awesome Moroccan Lentil Soup, this Minestrone, this Peanut Soup or search for a simple vegan curry. (I know many of my friends love their croc-pot which, I am sure, also makes great PBWF soups.) On a side note, why do carrots taste out-of-this-world amazing when they’ve simmered in a soup for an hour?

3. Broth, broth, broth

This tip is somewhat related to above soup tip, since vegetable broth is included in pretty much every soup. However, you can also use it to add flavor to stews, mashed potatoes, rice, lentils, cooked veggies – anything! You can make your own broth from scratch or like me (in accordance with tip number one) buy meal saving, ready-made, packaged bullion tablets from Knorr.

4. Exploring recipes is your new hobby

Forget Instyle, your new leisure reading materials are vegan cookbooks and PlantBased magazine. The Forks over Knives’ recipe app will become a dear friend as well. Downtime at work should be spent reading amazing health stories on how people survived [insert illness here] by going plant based. Anything to keep you motivated and inspired on this journey. Please note you may develop “militant vegan” type traits. (“My foot hurts” says random person, so you say “maybe you should go vegan!”)

5. Junk food is the hardest thing to quit

I had no problems quitting junk shopping a few years ago (Yay, go not made in China challenge!) but quitting junk food is not as easy. I have no magic trick that makes cheese all of a sudden taste gross. (Sorry animal activists, vegan cheese is not cheese.) I eat too many chips probably. The only tip I have when it comes to this part of it, is to create a directory of local, plant-based friendly take-out restaurants (like Chipotle, salad bars, Indian places) for when you need something quick. Then just do your best and pick something vegan. It may not be all “whole foods” but at least it’s plant based.

6. Find your signature meal

Last but not least, find your signature meal! Our go to is wholegrain spaghetti with vegan Bolognese: marinara sauce, onions, tomato, pea-protein and whatever veggies I feel like throwing in. We love it and baby eats it too. Dinner shouldn’t be difficult or fancy all the time, just nutrient packed.

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Meet Peanut Soup with brown rice (cooked in broth!). Yum.

That’s my whole list of wisdom! (So far.)

As for the future, I think Carrie Underwood put it best; “I am vegan but I don’t freak out if there is some cheese on my pasta.” (Cheating with cheese, also referred to as “cheesing”. LOL.)

Even PETA agrees; don’t be the vegan who makes a plant based diet look difficult by asking the waiter to check if there’s dairy in the burger bun. Instead be the person who makes a vegan, or vegetarian, diet seem tasty, easy and inclusive. That’s how you encourage others to cut their meat, become healthier and more planet minded.

Questions?

Let me know if anyone is or have been going through the same transformation!

10 weeks on a plant based whole foods diet: Here’s my progress

A few weeks ago I told you all about my struggle with a skin rash on my face (Perioral Dermatitis, “PD”) and how I was in desperate need to heal my body.

I, as you know, decided to do that by:

  • Eating a 100% plant-based, whole foods (PBWF) diet
  • Remove all toxic skin and body care from my life
  • Stress less with no Facebook and less social media time

To give you an idea of what was going on, here is the picture evidence. Not very flattering, I know, and honestly just how bad my PD really was at its worst, can’t be illustrated by a picture. Sad times for a somewhat vain woman like me.

Perioral DermatitisThe PBWF Diet.

I decided to start with my diet since chances were (according to the internet) that my issues were gut related.

I started to eat super clean which meant my body finally got a chance to thrive all while making it possible to pin-point triggers and find out why I (probably) developed PD in the first place – at least based what my body was telling me. (I haven’t been to a doctor since the dermatologist tried to sell me antibiotics and diagnosed this as “rosacea” back in August).

In regards to triggers, unfortunately every bite of (vegan) bread has made my skin worse. It has also made my stomach ache i.e. I believe I have developed gluten sensitivity. I have heard about women developing all sorts of allergies after pregnancy so chances are, I am one of them. I love bread and cookies so this S U C K S for me.

Moving on.

Another trigger for PD may be hormone imbalance, which also makes a PBWF diet the sensible choice. Stop consuming the hormones of other beings so that your own hormones can adjust back to normal. This also applies to anyone struggling with acne. Makes so much sense.

My skin started to clear, finally.

On top of that, with a PBWF diet, I have lost weight! So, yes, I am as smashing as I was before pregnancy (Ha! Almost). My husband has been on the PBWF diet too and he has lost over 10% body weight and experiences less back ache.

And, yes, there’s more. By eating a vegan diet for ten weeks we have saved at least:

  • 60 animals’ lives
  • 2,500 pounds of CO2
  • 3,500 square feet of forest land
  • 6,000 pounds of grain
  • 125,000 gallons of water

Aaaaah, that makes an environmentalist happy.

I will admit a PBWF diet takes time. I will share a post on how I’ve managed to cook and stay clean with a full time job and a 9 month old baby in a separate post! I’ll make sure I share some recipes too, though I normally don’t do that here on the blog :)

Non-toxic skin care.

Second part – topical intervention.

This “no toxic skin care pledge” quite quickly turned into “no make-up at all ever” which has been an eye-opening, time-saving and over all great experience. After YEARS of always doing my make-up almost every day, I am now totally comfortable in my own skin – even on the days my PD is flaring up a little (it does come and go, however there’s enormous progress each week). No one has said anything yet and I actually feel pretty most days. I will admit, I do make sure my hair looks good :)

I have been washing my skin with raw, unfiltered, organic honey each night before bed and used only non-toxic body care like Alba Botanica, pure coconut oil and Meow Meow Tweet deodorant and lip balm.

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Me – without a drop of make-up and almost clear skin

Less social media.

Third part – inner peace.

I am not sure that I’ve stressed way less these past ten weeks… Tesla and I still don’t have any patience for slow drivers, but it’s freaking awesome to not have Facebook! You know a friend told me that FB can listen in on conversations to better select appropriate ads for people! What!? I am out of that business, thank goodness.

Also, I have discovered that not caring about how often I post on Instagram, when I publish a blog, how many likes I get or to maintain an online “persona” is true freedom for me. This is why it’s taken forever to publish this post… (and I’ve been busy too!)

So that’s a bit of my progress in ONLY TEN WEEKS people. Isn’t it amazing? I’ll tell you a secret too: We’ve had a few (erm, several) pints of Ben & Jerry’s vegan ice-cream and we’ve been on a pizza date where I did have a bit of cheese on my gluten free pizza. We’ve also eaten French fries, chocolates, granola bars and pre-made veggie burgers. All that and still amazing progress. (Check back soon for more diet information :))

Oh, and aren’t you impressed?!