Tag Archives: second hand

Vacation, vacation, vacation: dealing with the aftermath (+ back to blogging!)

It’s been a bit quiet on the blog lately because 1. Vacation in Europe with baby and 2. Vacation in Europe without wifi. Yes, there are still places without it! (I did manage to publish one blog post about my new eco-friendly bag which I photographed i Denmark. Check it out here if you missed it :) )

Now, when it comes to vacationing, or traveling if you will, dealing with the guilt of flying is always hard. This activity, which I always try to undertake responsibly (have a great reason to go, travel zero waste) and rarely, is certainly the most unsustainable thing I do. One return trip to Sweden in economy class adds 1.28 metric tons of carbon to my yearly carbon footprint which is a lot. So what to do?

The easy and obvious thing to do is to carbon compensate, which I can do directly thru KLM’s website when buying the ticket (more on that in this post from last year) and/or by planting trees at Stand for Trees. This trip I realized that I could actually “compensate more” by collecting items abroad for baby August to bring home with me. That’s only previously used items – otherwise no point!

You’d be amazed what friends and family are hiding away in closets and are dying to get rid of. Because the people “donating” to me are my closest friends, not only do they have things I want, like and need, but also aren’t offended when I say no (aka “why’d you buy that?”). Most importantly they feel great about giving, they don’t have to spend money to spoil our baby, and together we prevent waste and reduce new material being purchased.

In addition to friends’ used (perfectly awesome) stuff, I also got my hands on a few of my own childhood items (sorting boxes at dad’s) which thrills me so.

The CO footprint of each and every thing I collected probably can’t be found on google, however I know it takes lots of energy, oil, resources and chemicals to produce just one new plastic cup. 

I like lists, so here is one of everything we brought home with us for baby August’s current and future endeavors!

  1. Lots of clothes 
  2. A pair of shoes
  3. A teether that goes in the freezer
  4. Three reusable squeeze pouches for baby food
  5. 10+ Spoons
  6. Four Plates
  7. Eight Bowls
  8. Three Cups
  9. Two baby bottles (not pictured – in the sink!)
  10. Two cans of baby food (my friend’s baby never got to!)
  11. A reflector
  12. Mini flounder for bath time (mine from 1989!)
  13. 20+ Children’s books in Swedish and Danish
  14. Eight baby books
  15. 13 Mini (pixi) books
  16. Five puzzles (one not pictured)
  17. Bib that catches food
  18. Pear-shaped mold for playing in sand
  19. Soft toy reindeer (which baby loves!)  

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Long list right? All of these things aren’t need-to-haves perhaps, but most are! How much carbon would I emit if I were to buy all of these items new?

I’m not sure, but not having to do so makes me feel better about those long fossil fuel burning flights we took. And, it IS more fun to have previously loved things :)

Now, vacation is over, I’m back to blogging (some fun posts coming up!), enjoying my last few weeks of maternity leave and, of course, living it green in Texas.

Hand me down goodies for eco-baby – and we’re pretty much all set

I don’t normally travel to Europe twice in one year due to the heavy carbon footprint of cross-Atlantic flying, but this year it just happened that way. I had lots of reasons to go for a second time (while this bump is growing and showing).

Meeting my new nephew was the main reason for the trip, however inhaling the cold, crisp air, enjoying the colors of fall, eating lots of foods I’ve been craving and taking the opportunity to collect (yes collect!) loads of hand me down goodies from family and friends for eco-baby were bonus reasons.

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My mom’s vegan cinnamon rolls and fall colors at dad’s.

It’s amazing what the people we know have at home and are more than willing to part ways with. Frankly, they’re dying for someone to use their storage and basement items again. Many seem to have too many things they want to give you (maybe they over-shopped?), in which case I say let your inner minimalist guide you – it’s has to be ok to say no if you don’t want or need what’s offered. Someone else they know might need that exact thing.

I’m trying to keep baby-inventory as low as possible, but I have come to accept that eco-baby will need a few things like clothes, a car seat, a stroller, a place to sleep and diaper stuff. With this trip, the clothes part is already completely taken care of! My nephews’ 0-3 months baby collection is now mine to use, and as he grows out of 3-6 and 6-9 and so on, hopefully those clothes can be handed down to us too.

Going through all the baby clothes, I was happy and impressed to see that my sister had bought almost exclusively organic cotton items. There were also a few handmade items; a cardigan knitted by our mom and a jacket and pants set from Sewing for Seeds – a Swedish eco brand based in Stockholm, sewing small batch fashion from organic cotton or recycled fabrics.

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Stack of organic onesies, Burt’s Bees pjs and Sewing for Seeds jacket

My oldest and dearest friend had sewn a homemade baby resting pad for her daughter and told me it was one of the best accessories she had had.  It allowed her to put the baby down anywhere to sleep, with no risk of her rolling over or falling down. The baby supposedly feels very safe and calm in it, as the design is meant to remind her of the tight space in the womb. She said to me “I just don’t know what to do with it now”, so I volunteered to give it a new home. Homemade things are so special! And may I add that a baby lounger like this one, costs above $150 online? Check out Dock a Tot (also made in Sweden) and you’ll get the idea.

In addition to ALL that, I found some of my old books and my mom had saved my old baby blanket and some towels too, which I also took with me. I feel so lucky to be able to revive some of the 80’s things I used when little. How retro and eco-friendly is that?!

With all these items in combination with a few things local US friends have already handed down to me, we’re now in GOOD shape.

Note. In order to reduce my carbon footprint while travelling, I carbon offset more than the calculated amount that my flight emits thru KLM’s webpage, however, there’s no real eco-friendly way to fly. Read more of my thoughts and how I do international air travel HERE.

Celebrating the season: Finally fall (bump) fashion!

It’s November! Finally some resemblance of fall in Houston. Actually, that’s a lie, it’s hot as hell but the calendar says November and with that it’s officially scarf season, my favorite one by far.

On my quest for sustainable maternity fashion, I went second hand shopping in Greenville, SC when we visited the region about a month ago, and found a pair of maternity jeans ($12) and this cotton-rayon mix dress. Perfect for cooler weather.

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Yes, it’s another straight line dress with stripes (you know that’s my thing!). It is one size up from what I’d normally wear, so I have some room, but there ain’t nothing maternity about it. Generally speaking, I want to be able to wear the clothes I invest in again and again, why not also the ones I buy while pregnant?

I paid $22 for the dress, and I swear it looks brand new. Great deal!

To me, sustainable fashion is using what’s in my closet as much and as long as possible, avoiding at all costs garments going to landfill. Especially ones that still look great. Did you know that by wearing a piece of clothing 50 times instead of five (the fast fashion average), you reduce carbon emissions by 400 percent per year, per garment?

So, I’m wearing my new dress with my (also) new, made in USA maternity tights from Storq.com and pre-challenge (unethically made) favorites from my ever so modest closet. Namely, my very favorite fall scarf (DSW 2012) that goes with everything, a bag my husband bought me (Coach 2012) and impulse purchased booties (Steve Madden 2009). If it’s already in my closet, I make sure I rock it. Bump or no bump!

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I don’t normally use filters on pictures but I figured Houston could use a little extra fall spirit created by one. And I happen to think little eco-baby on the way looks really cute in this light :)

How are you showing off what’s already in your closet this fall?

Pics by Shutterluv.

The clothing is old, what’s vintage is new, a purse that is borrowed & ballet flats in blue

Second hand shopping and I don’t always get along. I get impatient and picky and normally leave empty handed. But now and again, on an odd day out, I strike gold. (Fake gold that is.) Why I keep at it? Because it’s the most eco-friendly way to add new things to my closet and I support small neighborhood businesses while doing so!

First, let me introduce my “new” flower broche. A vintage piece that I immediately fell for at the Vintage Revival boutique south of Houston. I paid $10.50. I love using a spectacular broche as the focal point on a (dull) purse!

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Vintage Broche from Vintage Revival Shop, Nassau Bay, TX

This plastic clutch was actually my grandmother’s. She got it for free with a mail-order make-up purchase, sometime in the early 2000s, and I snagged it right away. Finders keepers, you know? That goes for the broche and the clutch bag.

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Made in USA ballet flats, second hand blouse, upcycled jeans

The blouse is ALSO a “new” second hand find! Can you believe it?

This is Lucky Brand (lucky me), from who knows when, which I got for $10 at a local resale shop. I love the pattern and I love how the blue plus red threads “make” purple, allowing me to wear one of my favorite old scarves with it. Scarves always make every outfit better (logic according to Anna). This one was a gift from my mom.

The jeans are my “overhauled” old boot-cut Gap jeans that I blogged about last week, and the flats are, of course, my made in USA Oka-B’s. The BEST (and cutest) shoes for Houston’s wet weather.

Sustainable fashion at its best; garments that are old, a vintage broche that is new, a purse that is borrowed (no return date set) and of course, ballet flats in blue.

That’s how that saying goes, right? ;)

Picture credits: Shutterluv by Ashley.