Tag Archives: sustainable fashion

Bye Bye made right (here) – HELLO Sustainable Anna (that’s me!)

New year, new ideas. The time has come to change the name of this blog.

When I started blogging in 2014, I had just embarked on a journey to change my life by reducing my consumption. So, naturally, I wrote about what I bought, what I didn’t (made in China!) and how everyone could join in to shop local and fair.

Four years later, it seems all I talk about is vegan food, my eco-baby and how much I hate plastic. Sure, there are local products at display but “Made right (here)” just doesn’t cut it anymore.

I’m sustainable. My name is Anna. And here I am; trying a new blog name that allows a broader index of subjects.

Sustainable Anna

I want to share more recipes (I have to write a post about all the wonderful things lentils can do ASAP!) and I want to be more me. When I say that I mean a bit more ramblings, fewer perfectly written articles. Though that may sound like a step in the wrong direction for someone who dreams about writing full time, I simply have less time to edit and research my blog posts with a baby/toddler in my life than I did a year ago!

I’ve also updated my About page and deleted/changed the Look Book. Who cares where I bought my clothes – right? Sustainable style is about finding YOUR STYLE and doing it ethically. Plus the Look Book had so many garments that I had bought several years ago, available then but no longer. Pointless. Of course, I’ll still write posts about clothes and brands when I buy something new :)

Welcome to “Sustainable Anna”. The Blog. The Woman. The Legend.

(Ok, that’s a joke.)

Let me know what you all think!

PS. Thank you Sandra for helping me decide on where to take the blog! Love you!

Anniversary post: Four years since I went “green” and changed my world (and maybe yours!)

Hi!

I’m Anna and I’m on a Not Made in China Challenge. Today happens to be my challenge anniversary! That’s right, four years ago today I pledged to stop over-consuming, stop supporting unethical fashion brands and to buy as much (%wise) made in USA items as possible.

IMG_4938
Hi there! This is me :)

This pledge started my journey towards green living. Before that, I thought recycling, bringing bags to the grocery store and supporting World Wildlife Foundation with a bit of cash each month was the definition of being “eco friendly”. Yes, we all start somewhere. (If you’re not even doing those things, take a minute and reflect.)

Every year since I started the challenge, I’ve taken different steps to lower my carbon footprint like starting a compost, switching cars, limiting my shopping, quitting beef, to name a few and this year is no different.

More specifically, in 2017 I have:

  • Gone plant based for real. Hardly any cheating, guys! My husband has joined in on it too – like 90% joined in. I am so proud and impressed by his actions.
  • Kept up with cloth diapering our bundle of cuteness and poop. (Update post coming soon!)
  • Joined the Sierra Club and Planet Parenthood as a monthly donor. So easy.
  • Shopped even less (for myself) than last year. How is that even possible?!
  • Seriously revamped my bathroom/beauty routine meaning fewer, only all natural products in mostly zero waste packaging. Daily make-up no more.

I’m proud of all my efforts but going plant based has been the best decision ever. It takes a lot of thought and motivation and I did cheat during the holidays because gingerbread and cheese. However, I recognize that going vegan is a work in progress just like the not made in China challenge was (and is), so I’m not too hard on myself. I’ll get there :)

So, have I failed my Not Made in China Challenge at all?

YES. Oh my god, yes.

Keeping a baby happy and healthy takes time and thought which leads to shortcuts. There’s been take out in styrofoam, some unnecessary driving around to keep baby asleep in the car, baby things I didn’t need (erhm, sorry not sorry) and also a few items MADE IN CHINA! [Insert panic emoji here.] Namely a high chair, a robot vacuum, backsplash tile, a rain cover for the car seat, a pack and go stroller and a new pod-free coffee maker (hallelujah Ninja!).

I know, I know. I’ve gotten more China items this year than I did for the past three combined!

I guess some years you “need” things and some years you don’t. Having a new baby I think automatically classifies 2017 as a year we did need stuff. (A coffee maker and a robot vacuum fall in that baby-category! They do! Both were Christmas gifts for ourselves.) I actually think we’ve done really well acquiring very, very few things of which most were made in USA, Fair Trade or second hand. Go us.

Best Nine 2017 Sustainableanna
Best nine on Instagram 2017. I absolutely love all these pictures!

2017. It’s been an interesting year. (Don’t get me started on Trump.) It’s been a busy year too for me; not just at home with baby but at work as well. I haven’t blogged as much as I wanted to (wrote 45 posts compared to 60 in 2016) but that’s ok. This green mama/manager/newly crowned vegan cook can’t do it all. (Hint, neither can you.)

I’m thankful for everyone reading, commenting, engaging, and sharing! Also, I am so happy and grateful that I get to inspire you and be a small part of your journey towards a greener life with less consumption, better choices, less meat and most importantly: increased awareness.

Stick around for 2018 why don’t you!? I promise to do my best to make you think, smile and learn.

Happy new year guys.

Here’s to another year on the challenge.

PS. Please, pretty please, share your small or big eco-successes you had in 2017 in the comments. That would make me and everyone reading super thrilled and pumped for the new year :)

Finally some sustainable fashion on the blog! (A NEW made in USA outfit)

You’ve probably been wondering if I am ever going to blog about sustainable, made in USA fashion again, and believe me, I have been wondering the same thing. It’s been a year since my last, proper, photo blog!

People always say, when you have a child your priorities change. This always sounded so negative to me, like the parents had been “forced” to change their priorities and were upset about it, but now, at least speaking for myself, I so enjoy having new priorities! What’s better than spending the weekend at home with our little bub? Exactly! Nothing beats that. Not even a photoshoot.

Ok, yes, I have also had some skin issues, which has made it not so appealing to get in front of the camera. However, today, I happened to love the outfit I wore for the office holiday party and my skin is quite good, so I decided to take some selfies!

This is a great, flowy dress from Via 74 with long sleeves, in an A-shape with stripes. It is polyester which isn’t eco-super, but it is made in USA, has pockets and is totally Anna. TOTALLY Anna. (You know this by now. Stripes + blue.)

Made in USA cardigan and dress
Love these colors together!

I found this long cardigan at Nordstrom Rack when I was there looking for a new pair of jeans to wear at the office the other day. It was hanging alone in the clearance section (only $34!) and I know why it ended up there: giant fabric bows on each sleeve which were totally ruining the look. Since the fabric is a rayon blend (also not very eco-friendly unfortunately) I knew I could cut them off without damaging or having to mend the fabric, so I bought it, fixed it and now I love it! (Brand is Pleione.)

Made in USA fashion
“Selfie posing” as if this was a Christmas catalogue. Nailed it.

Question: Is it more sustainable to shop new clothes from the clearance rack than it is from regular stores? What happens to the last pieces on a clearance rack if they aren’t sold? Can I consider myself someone who saved this awesome cardigan from landfill?!

Maybe ;) I would love to hear your thoughts on this one!

Oh, Texas winter outfits, I love you.

PS. Tights are old ones from Express (made in USA), scarf is my pre-challenge DSW favorite (made in China) and booties are 2013 Ecco. Old is sustainable too!

It’s Small Business Saturday!

Today is Small Business Saturday! A day to remember our small community shops, farmers’ markets and locally owned businesses.

Made in USA menswear

I love Thanksgiving weekend because I have four days off work and we never have any plans. See, it’s not all bad not having any family in the country and not caring about football or Black Friday sales. (Speaking of which, I hope you decided to skip the stores yesterday and instead enjoyed your day with friends, family, Mother Nature or Netflix!)

I am all about shopping small though!

Actually, the core of my Not Made in China Challenge is to shop from small, local businesses using sustainable production practices and eco-friendly materials. The efforts I make to do that supports our communities; the tax-paying entrepreneurs, makers, builders and artisans living here.

Supporting a small family business might help them afford a trip, Spanish lessons, donating to a non-profit or get health insurance when/if the GOP takes it away! That’s powerful.

Basically, small business Saturday is about just that.

It’s about “Main Street not Wall Street”. (My favorite hashtag!)

So go explore everything small this Holiday Season! It will be less stressful than the mall, you may find something  handmade and meaningful to bring home or give away and end up having interesting conversations with friendly store owners while you’re at it. You can shop small online too! Check out some great brands here and local Texas’ makers here.

Just like Earth Day is everyday – Small Business Saturday is everyday too.

Wishing you all a great continuation of this Thanksgiving weekend!

 

Five brands that’ll make you Captain Sustainable Underpants!

A question I get asked a lot is “Do you know any made in USA underwear brands?” to which I always reply: Yes, as a matter of fact I do!

Made in USA isn’t really enough, they need to be sustainable too, right? Here’s my list of fabulous makers to get you started. (Two undies-makers are not based here but made the list anyway!)

Sustainable underwear brands

1. Hanky Panky

Made in: North East USA since 1977

They’ve got: Women’s lingerie, sleepwear, bras, bralettes, panties.

Sustainable because: It’s made right here which is great for our economy and our people. 100% of the fabrics and trims used to make their lace styles are knitted in the USA as well. The styles I have bought are all organic cotton (grown here!) which is safe for farmers, lands and butts alike.

Awesome because: It’s sexy and sustainable. Organic cotton undies are often pretty boring, but not here. Also this is the only American-made brand that offers padded, shaped bras – not just soft bralettes.

Fun Fact: Instead of water coolers with plastic bottles, Hanky Panky has installed filters to purify their NYC tap water, and each employee is provided with a BPA-free reusable water cup to reduce waste around the office.

Hanky Panky organic cotton

2. BGreen

Made in: Rancho Dominguez, California.

They’ve got: Women’s and men’s underwear, shirts, base layers.

Sustainable because: Made of organic cotton, recycled cotton or recycled polyester. 100% of the fabric scraps generated during the cutting process is recycled adding up to about 200,000 lbs. of material per year that doesn’t end up in the landfill! The factory is Fair Trade Certified which signifies that rigorous social, environmental, and economic standards have been met.

Awesome because: You can’t take for granted that garment workers in Los Angeles actually make a good living even if we are, by definition, talking “Made in USA”. (Immigrant workers are often taken advantage of, not making a living wage, which unfortunately is why lots of “cheaper” made in USA clothes are made in California.) With a Fair Trade Certification we know we can trust BGreen!

Fun Fact: In addition to their own production, this family-owned factory has been producing apparel for some of the best-known brands in United States for over 30 years.

3. Brook There

Made in: Fall River, Massachusetts.

They’ve got: Women’s underwear, bralettes, tops, dresses, skirts, leggings.

Sustainable because: The base fabric is an organic cotton jersey made from GOTS-certified yarn, milled in South Carolina and dyed in Pennsylvania. All undies are shipped straight from the cut and sew facility, and not a separate warehouse, meaning they don’t have to use any plastic bags for storage. Plastic free and organic! Yay!

Awesome because: The underwear is comfortable, comes in many styles and super pretty. Oh, and I love their modern, organic, cool take on the granny panty! (They call it the “boyshort” though ;))

Fun Fact: Brook There’s design studio happens to be situated on an organic vegetable farm.

Brook There made in USA organic underwear

4. PACT

Made in: India, Turkey.

They’ve got: Women’s and men’s underwear, shirts, pants, sleepwear, socks.

Sustainable because: PACT’s underwear factory is Certified Fair Trade which complies with legislation regarding maximum working hours, overtime compensation and other benefits  such as transport to and from the jobsite, company sponsored meals, health plans, and funding for workers’ children’s education. The cotton used in PACT undies is GOTS-certified organic cotton. You can read more about cotton farmers and the importance of supporting organic fields in India here.

Awesome because: Comfy and soft. Also, they’ve got several fun prints with flowers and stripes – not just solid colored cotton. And this brand is not just for grownups, they’ve got a few baby onesies too.

Fun Fact: I’ve blogged about PACT before! You can read that post here.

5. Thinx

Made in: Sri Lanka

They’ve got: Women’s period underwear, active wear.

Sustainable because: Thinx underwear is period underwear. Meaning that by having a few of these in your drawer you can save lots of disposable pads and liners from hitting the landfill! If you’re curious about waste free periods, check out Kathryn’s post at Going Zero Waste here. All Thinx’s manufacturing is certified Fair Trade and they just added an organic cotton line of undies! 

Awesome because: This company is run by women, sewn by women and made for women. The Thinx undies do work (holds the same amount as about two tampons), fit nicely and look like regular undies.

Fun Fact: They also have a fair trade (not aid!) initiative going on where girls are trained in entrepreneurship and sewing, among other things, reusable pads. It may be hard to grasp but periods are a major issue in some developing countries, preventing girls from attending school several days per month, which means they’re lagging behind their male peers. You can read more about Thinx’s foundation here.

Brook There organic hipster panty

That’s it! Five brands. Five styles.

I have to say my super favorite is Hanky Panky’s boyshort undies in organic cotton with lace trim ($32). I “need” twenty of those ASAP :)

***

This list wasn’t what you were looking for? Here are some bonus tips:

Looking for socks? I’d go to REI (so many made in USA brands!) or order me some Colorado-made Smartwool’s. In need of a maternity bra? You’ll find a comfy one at Storq.com. All in all disappointed with my coverage of men’s underwear? Here’s a list of made in USA brands to check out (my husband hasn’t tried them so can’t recommend any specifically!). In Europe? Woron Store might be for you.

Is your new dress funding North Korea’s nuclear program? Find out.

You know, some people think it’s really silly to refuse straws and shop local. They “kind of care” about the environment, and yes, they’ll agree climate change is real, but it’s just not enough for them to change any of their habits.

Keeping our environment safe isn’t enough. Reducing global warming (yes, that ol’ term!) isn’t enough.

So, a Not Made in China challenge is CRAZY right? Why would anyone give up shopping away on Amazon for something like that!??

I recently shared my six reasons for not buying made in China here on the blog, and although one of them has nothing to do with the environment, all six are rooted in sustainability. Sustainable world, sustainable economy.

“Anna, we don’t care about sustainability! We care about cheap stuff!”

I know.

However, here’s something “awesome” that has just been revealed, that some of you might actually care about:

Your made in China clothes could be made in North Korea.

Yes, you read that right.

It’s becoming more and more common for Chinese textile businesses to take advantage of the cheap labor across the border, yet still labeling items “Made in China” according to a recent report from Reuters.

“Textiles were North Korea’s second-biggest export after coal and other minerals in 2016, totaling $752 million, according to data from the Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency (KOTRA).”

The fascinating thing about that is that all of North Korea’s factories are state-owned. Remind me now, how do we all like the state of North Korea?

“In North Korea, factory workers can’t just go to the toilet whenever they feel like, they think it slows down the whole assembly line. They aren’t like Chinese factory workers who just work for the money. North Koreans have a different attitude – they believe they are working for their country, for their leader.”

Would you, as an American, sleep well at night knowing that YOU helped fund North Korea’s nuclear program?

Our purchases matter. EVERY DAMN TIME. For so many reasons.

I may be a tree-hugging, tag checking, straw refusing liberal, but at least I know who and what I am funding with my dollars.

Do you?

[Quotes from the Reuters article, which you can read HERE.]

I want my baby to wear ethical fashion; starting with his bibs!

Do you know what makes shopping local so wonderful and extra awesome?

It’s that behind almost every brand committed to fair and local manufacturing stands a woman or man with a vision to make the world better. No bullshit. This is what I find over and over with made right (here) brands.

Some are motivated by sustainability, some by employing their neighbors , some want to bring craftsmanship back. Some, like the founders of Sweedie Kids, found that with their scarf-like bibs, they could make a big impact on the life of bigger kids with disabilities.

Sweedie Kids bib big kid disabilities

“We care about giving, and we do that through “Sweedie Dreams”. When you purchase a Big Kid Bib, you are contributing to Sweedie Dreams because it’s not just a product, it represents our passion for serving those with special needs. For each Big Kid Bib we sell, we give $1 to an organization tied to serving those with different abilities.”

Nowadays it’s not that hard to find cute, made in USA bibs for babies, but what makes Sweedie Kids the most ethical choice is that they’re also making bibs for a market that is so often forgotten. For children who are so often forgotten.

Super absorbent, cool designs and made from Oeko-Tex certified fabrics (i.e. certified safe, sustainable, ethical materials), these bibs get the job done no matter the age of the wearer.

Made in USA baby bib cactus

August has been modeling these bibs since he was about three months old. I wouldn’t go as far as saying they make drooling cool, but maybe just a tad bit more fashionable. (They’re also pretty great for when we practice drinking out of a glass. Let’s just say that not all the water ends up in baby’s tummy just yet!)

Check out Sweedie Kids here. Bibs start at $8.

Handmade in USA of imported fabrics.

Five eco-friendly handbags Made in USA! Mostly vegan too!

A while back I wrote a post about the environmental footprint of leather, saying we should buy less of it and buy better. Better in this case meaning locally sourced hides, vegetable tanned, high quality and handcrafted where you live.

But, then came the question; If we are to buy fewer leather bags – are there any durable, good-looking, made in USA, vegan handbags out there we can buy instead?

Of course.

When it comes to “pleather”, a plastic, leather-looking material, often found at H&M and Forever 21, I have one thing to say: no thanks. It breaks, it doesn’t look as good, and we don’t like plastic anyway, now do we? There is a new material in town though, Piñatex, which looks a lot like leather, is durable and also eco-friendly. Piñatex fibres are the by-product of the pineapple harvest so no extra land, water, fertilizers or pesticides are required to produce them. However, shops are not exactly overflowing with this material yet, and why if we don’t want leather would we have bags that look like leather?

I say screw that! Instead why not venture out and pick one of these five nothing-to-do-with-leather materials:

1. Cork

Cork is super sustainable and as it turns out, super stylish.

Did you know that a cork tree that has its bark removed every nine years will absorb up to five times as much CO2 as a tree that doesn’t? In other words using the cork is good for the tree, good for the environment and good for, mainly, Spain’s and Portugal’s economies.

One brand to keep in mind if you’re into the look and durability of cork, is Nest Pure. Handcrafted, high quality bags and accessories, made right here in Minnesota. In addition to the main material, cork, the bags come with various colors of organic cotton.

Nest Pure vegan cork clutch
I want this one!

2. Recycled Sails

It may sound like a bit of a stretch but old, no longer usable sails from boats become the most awesome tote bags up in Maine. You may have read my blog post a few weeks ago about Seabags of Maine and my new turtle tote? If not, check it out here for more details about this cool brand.

Seabags of Maine vegan handbag
Me and my bag.

PS. The fabrics are not really recycled, they’re “reused” :)

3. Cotton

What’s wrong with the look of cotton? Actually, nothing as far as I’m concerned! I’ve been sporting my cotton tote bag quite a bit on the blog actually.

Cotton is great because it’s natural, yet durable and easy to wash. (Organic cotton is obviously better for the environment than conventional cotton is, but let’s keep focusing on the vegan thing and just say cotton bags are cool!)

Brands to check out: Seltzer Goods (USA), MapTote (USA) and Morado Designs (organic, USA).

Maptote texas clutch
Love this print!

4. Waxed Canvas

Canvas is made from either linen, hemp or cotton – all natural materials – and make for durable fabrics when waxed. What about the wax you say? Well, yes, using beeswax means this fabric is not vegan, so I’m cheating a little, but it is still far from the eco-nightmare of leather. In my opinion, using beeswax makes much more sense than using a poly-based (fossil fuel) wax. But that’s just me.

Newton Supply Co. out of Austin, Texas, makes the cutest waxed canvas bags. (Some do come with natural color, veg-tanned leather details so look out for that.) This company is extra awesome because they’re partnered with Open Arms, a division of the Austin-based Multicultural Refugee Coalition which empowers refugee women by providing living wage employment. Cool.

Newton Supply Co Texas handbag
Oooh, I want this one too.

5. Seat Belts

It may be unusual, but yes, Harvey’s makes bags out of seat belts, in sunny California. There are endless styles, colors and sizes to chose from. My good friend has a backpack, which is lightweight, well made and sized “just right”.

Harvey's backpack vegan handbag
My friend with her cool blue bag.

The company started out using actual old seat belts, salvaged from broken cars, which was super sustainable! I’m pretty sure the current handbags are made from newly woven “seat belts” though. Still, this unusual “fabric” makes for a fun, vegan handbag.

6. Bonus Tip: If all else fails, go second hand

Here’s what, if you can’t stand carrying a purse that doesn’t look like leather or in fact IS made of leather, yet you’re not keen on another cow dying and more pollutants being released; second hand will be your saving grace. Mom’s or grandma’s closet is normally a great place to start browsing! It’s made, it’s there, give that leather bag a new home.

(And yes, I do know that a vegan would never go for option number 4 or 6, but not all leather-skipping readers are. It’s all about inspiration to shop differently ;))

Anyone still in the mood for a leather bag made in China??!

 

Style of the summer: Fair-trade, 100% organic, made right (THERE!)

Despite being on a shop-local-misson, when it’s fair-trade and organic, I occasionally import. This summer, I decided to import a shirt.

After all, certified fair-trade initiatives must be supported and organic cotton growers in India must get paid. In fact, because of our purchases, they make a much better, safer living than farmers still growing conventional (pesticide-covered, fertilized, Monsanto seed) cotton.

Did you know that due to debt owed to the seed producer, one conventional cotton farmer commits suicide every eight hours in India? That’s three souls per day.

When we demand organic fabric, more and more farmers can make the transition to growing organic crops. Here’s a promising read about how growing organic cotton frees Indian families from the (GMO) debt traps, if you’re interested.

Back to the shirt.

Organic cotton PrAna Gina Top

A light, airy, plaid shirt from eco-friendly brand PrAna looks and feels just right for summer and my upcoming days at the office (going back to work soon!).

100% organic cotton, certified fair-trade, soft, great fit. Also, loving me some great bonus details such as the green stitching on just one of the button holes and a hidden pocket on the right side. I paid $47 for this shirt (sale price!) at our very favorite co-op REI right here in Houston.

 

Organic is cool.

Prana.com

Oh, and you might be wondering how much I’ve shopped this year, since I’ve written posts about a few new things lately! In addition to this shirt I’ve gotten a new eco-friendly bag ($160/USA/recycled fabric), a handmade scarf ($55/USA/organic), black tights ($10/USA/cotton) and a well made t-shirt ($36.50/USA/cotton). Five things in six months – that’s pretty good!

I’m wearing a size XS of the “Gina Shirt”, I’m 5’8″, 140’ish lbs.

Come SEA my new eco-friendly bag!

Mama’s got a new bag. And I love it.

The cool thing about this new bag by my new favorite maker Seabags of Maine, is that it’s made from old sails. Some may refer to the fabric as “recycled” but actually it’s simply reused, or upcycled, if you will. No energy consuming recycling process is needed to turn sails into bags – just washing, handcraft, threads and needles. That’s American handcraft of course.

sea turtle seabags of maine
Medium size Seabag with Sea Turtle!

“Our materials come from Maine first, New England second and USA third. We use the last remaining thread manufacturer in the U.S. We use the only rope manufacturer in New England. And our sail supply chain? Well, that’s as local as it gets. We collect our sails one at a time through a network of passionate boaters who love our community waters as much as we do.”

Though there are plenty of prints and designs to pick from, this medium size (14″ x 14″) turtle tote had my name on it.

I fell in love with turtles when we first moved to Texas because they’re everywhere! In ponds, lakes, bayous and sometimes backyards. Mostly we’ve got the red-eared slider here, and I’m pretty sure that that’s a sea turtle on my bag, but I love them all equally. (I love them more than enough to never use straws in my drinks! ;))

sea turtle seabags of maine
I love the look of the rope.

My new tote bag is sturdy, easy to clean (wipe off!), great size (I’ve got lots of baby gear with me and recently used it as carry-on on a cross-atlantic flight – it worked perfectly), vegan and has a very low carbon footprint for something new – being as it’s partly “old”. In fact, over the past 15 years, Seabags of Maine have saved over 500 tons of material from going into landfills.

And that is how it should be done, fashion industry.

seabags of maine turtle bag
Windbreaker needed. It’s cold, and I love it.

PS. Since we are on vacation in Scandinavia at the moment, I shot these pictures on a Danish beach, on the other side of the Atlantic from where this bag was made. Same water, different shore. Pretty poetic.

Bags start at $45, totes at $120. Read more at Seabags.com